Best Marketing Degrees http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org Mon, 27 Mar 2017 22:08:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.3 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/bestmarketingdegrees-36x36.png Best Marketing Degrees http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org 32 32 The Top 20 Online Masters in Communications Degree Programs http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/top-20-online-masters-communications-degree-programs/ Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:36:08 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=999 Ever dream of creating engaging media, monitoring campaigns, informing the world, and making a good paycheck? Media and communications managers make an average salary of over $125k nationwide according to […]

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Ever dream of creating engaging media, monitoring campaigns, informing the world, and making a good paycheck? Media and communications managers make an average salary of over $125k nationwide according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and with the recent growth in importance of online content in marketing and engagement efforts, there are more positions in the field than ever. While you can enter into the marketing or media department of an organization and work your way up to management, a number of specialized skills and frameworks can be hard to come by on the job, and a masters in communications degree can fast track your progress towards your goals. As with many degree types, an ever-increasing number of masters in communications degrees may now be completed online and with greater flexibility than ever before. We’ve taken a look at all online masters in communications programs available as of March 2017, and have ranked them according to the following three user-verified and trusted metrics:

Methodology
    Affordability (1/3): the out-of-state tuition per credit hour for programs surveyed.
  • Flexibility (1/3): the number of flexibility-enhancing program components, including the number of concentrations, specializations, and emphases, accelerated course options, and lenient transfer policies.
  • Core Curriculum Areas (1/3): the number of core curriculum areas with coursework offered in the degree, including strategic communication, conflict management, audience research, and courses on new/online media.

1.) Missouri State University

Missouri State University is a public, state university located in Springfield, Missouri. Home to some 26,000 students, the university is the second largest in the state. The university was established in 1906 as a normal school (teacher college) and has been growing ever since. The university offers over 100 majors at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and is reasonably priced (even for a public, state institution) across the boards. As a whole, the university is a regionally ranked institution according to US News, and is also ranked as one of the top 20 public schools in the nation. A wide range of online offerings are also available from the university.

The fully online Master in Communications offered by Missouri State University places as the number one program in this years ranking due to high marks in flexibility-enhancing components as well as full marks in core curriculum ares covered. Accordingly, students in the program are afforded the opportunity to pursue coursework in all four of the subject matter areas surveyed in this ranking: strategic communication, conflict management, audience research, and new/online media. Furthermore, students may specialize their degrees, with eight focus areas (the second most of any program survyed). Focus areas include Conflict and mediation, Family communication, Health communication, Interpersonal communication, Organizational communication, Public relations, Rhetoric and argumentation, or Small group communication. Coursework is a mixture of theory and practice, with “book learning” balanced with opportunities for group learning, internships and practicums. While the many focus areas allow for greater flexibility as to what setting graduates may work in the future, it’s also of note that the program is great preperation for further research, phd programs, or opportunities teaching communications (with several graduated moving on to teach at top universities after finishing their communications degree at MSU).

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $568
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Accelerated and three tracks
  • Core Curriclum Score: 4/4
   

2.) University of Florida

The University of Florida is a public land-grant, sea-grant, space-grant research university with a main campus located in Gainesville, Florida. Home to almost 50,000 students at the graduate and undergraduate levels, the university is the 8th largest university by student body size in the United States. Classified as a very high research level university, Florida is a great location at which to pursue postgraduate work, and is regularly ranked as one of the top 15 public schools in the nation. The University of Florida’s name also holds clout internationally, with the University recently being assessed as the 90th best university in the world according to research grants procured and faculty output. In recent years the university has expanded dramatically expanded the number of students it can reach with its world class facilities and faculty through the unveiling of a wide range of online degrees. A wide host of online degrees are offered by UF at the graduate and undergraduate level, including a particularly impressive 9 degree specializations in Mass Communication.

The fully online Mass Communication degree offered by the University of Florida ranks highly in all three metrics surveyed for our ranking: flexibility, core curriculum areas, and price point. With 9 specialization areas available in the Mass Communication Masters, there are more ways to tailor the UF degree than any other surveyed. Specialization areas include audience anaytics, digital strategy, global strategic communications, political communications, public interest communications, public relations and communications management, social media, and web design and online communication. Many degree options also equip students with job-ready certifications in technical and widely recognized skillsets. Some icing on the cake, UF’s program comes in at the middle of the pack in terms of out-of-state tuition, making the program a great deal for one of the best in the nation.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $552
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Two Communications Programs
  • Core Curriclum Score: 4/4

3.) Ohio University

Ohio University is a public research university with a main campus located in Athens, Ohio. Home to some 26,000 students at the graduate and undergraduate levels, the university has one of the 25 largest residential enrollments of colleges in the United States. Originally charted in 1787, Ohio University is also one of the oldest universities in the United States. Almost 300 total degree types are offered by the university, making it a storied, historical, and practical choice for strong students in many disciplines. In recent years the university has been noted as a prominent high-quality online degree provider as well. Over 5,000 students are currently enrolled in only online courses at the university. Accolades of the university include being a top 100 university in the United States, as well as being noted as one of the top Fulbright Scholar participants in the United States (alongside the likes of UCLA, Boston College, and Princeton University). Other awards are commonly brought home by OU graduates as well, with over 70 prominant award recipients in a number of recent years.

The fully online Masters in organizational communication offered by Ohio University places highly in our ranking due to its very affordable price point, as well as one of the few programs surveyed that offer all core curriculum areas we looked for in our ranking. The degree is also flexible, as it was built from the ground up specifically to serve those already working in some communications field and looking to advance their career with a degree while working. Don’t let the additional flexibility lead you to think the program is lacking in support or academic rigor, however. Courses are designed with plenty of room for interaction with fellow students and instructors through video conferencing, and the degree may be completed in as few as 15 months. A capstone experience affords students a culminative experience with the choice of a comprehensive exam, an applied project, or a master’s thesis. An additional selling point of the program is the price point, coming in at the more affordable of all programs surveyed!

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $243
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 4/4

4.) Concordia University – Saint Paul

Concordia University in Saint Paul is a private university member of the Concordia University System, a ten-member group of universities affiliated with the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod. Home to some 4,000 students, the university is known for liberal arts programming, and has been around since 1893. The University is classified as a regionally ranked university by organizations such as US News. Located in the Twin Cities — a thriving and multifaceted market — students enjoy connections to many opportunities within the region, for research projects, internships, and service learning opportunities. In other news, the University was recently known for considerable tuition cuts for their students and potential students during and in the aftermath of the great recession.

The fully online Master of Arts in Strategic Communications Management offered by Concordia University of Saint Paul ranks highly in all three metrics surveyed for this ranking: affordability, flexibility, and subject matter areas covered by the program. The program is the 5th most affordable of those surveyed for our ranking, with a tuition rate of $575 per credit hour. As a private university offering the full complement of support services this makes the program quite a steal. On the flexibility front, the degree is presented for working adults, and offers accelerated 7 week classes to help students structure course work around their busy home or work lives. Three of four surveyed core subject matter areas were covered in the program, including strategic communications, crisis management, and new media/online communications.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $475
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Accelerated courses
  • Core Curriclum Score: 3/4

5.) Northeastern University

Northeastern University is a private research university with a main campus located in Boston, Massachusetts. Home to some 25,000 students, the university is regularly ranked as one of the top 50 schools in the nation and is designated a very high research level institution. With a number of top programs particularly in practical disciplines, the university has expanded to offer graduate programming at a number of satellite campuses located in hubs of business and innovation: Silicon Valley, Seattle, Charlotte, and Toronto. Many courses of study at the university are known as being interdisciplinary and entrepreneurial, with undergraduate level “co-ops” in which students work in real world settings expected. In line with this type of hands-on problem solving education, recent years have seen substantial growth in the university’s student-led Venture Accelerateor, a startup incubator.

The fully online Master of Science in Corporate and Organizational Communication program offered by Northeastern University scores highly in two metrics surveyed by our rankings: flexibility and core subject areas covered. The flexibility score for the program is bolstered by a wide range of career-centered concentrations including Social Media, Public Relations, Human Resource Management, Project Management, or Leadership. Professors in the program further augment the practical focus of the program, bringing real world experience to students as practicioners in the field themself. All core subject matter areas surveyed in our ranking were offered in courses within the program, including crisis management, new media communications, strategic communications, and audience research. While the program is on the pricier end of programs surveyed, it’s also a world class education from one of the top ranked schools in the nation. The program also offers a unique benefit to current PR professionals holding an accreditation in public relations, offering a 20% tuition discount and accelerated time until degree.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $646
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Specializations
  • Core Curriclum Score: 4/4

6.) Bellevue University

Bellevue University is a private not-for-profit university with a main campus located in Bellevue, Nebraska. The university is home to some 10,000+ students, and from its outset has been known as a provider of educational outreach, adult education, and career-centered academic offerings. In line with the Universities focus on practical and adult education, a great deal of the university programming is offered with the choice of taking classes online or in-person, in a cohort-based model or in an accelerated model. In short, the university seeks to provide flexible programming often crucial for adult learners across the range of its academic offerings. BU is a regionally classified school according to US News, and is regionally accredited (the highest form of accreditation) by the Higher Learning Commission.

The fully online Master of Arts in Business and Professional Communication degree offered by Bellevue University ranks highly in all three metrics surveyed: affordability, flexibility, and number of curriculum areas covered. Particularly for a private university, tuition is affordable, and comes in as the 10th most affordable of programs surveyed at $545 per credit hour. Programming for the degree is flexible as well, offering a wide range of practical concentrations including Business, Computer Information Systems, Executive Coaching, Human Resource Management, Project Management, Transnational and Cross-cultural Communication, and Interdisciplinary Studies. Almost 2000 students and formar students have ranked the program 4/5 stars on the program homepage. It’s also noteworthy that the course of study covers all major curriculum areas surveyed: conflict management, strategic communications, new media communications, and audience research methods.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $545
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Concentrations
  • Core Curriclum Score: 3/4

7.) Lasell College

Lasell College is a private, non-religious college with a main campus located in Newton, Massachusetts. Enrollment at the college is small, with just under 2,000 students. A wide range of offerings are available, however, including undergraduate and graduate offerings in the liberal arts and professional preperation fields. Though small, the college has been recognized as one of the 10 fastest growing in the country, and is well positioned for future growth with a prime location 10 miles from Boston and close to quality public transportation. The school is known for service learning, with over 85% of students participating in some form of service learning. Classes are small, with almost 70% of classes having less than 20 students. The most popular majors include Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, and Fashion Merchandising and Business Administration and Management. Lasell College is regionally accredited, and classified as a regionally ranked university.

The fully online Master in Science in Communication Degree places highly in our ranking due to its high marks in flexibility and core curriculum areas covered. Flexibility-enhancing components include three concentrations including health communications, integrated marketing communications, and public relations. The program is also flexible through the amount of time students may complete it in, ranging from 12-24 months depending on a students availability. Instructional quality is upheld in the program through capping courses at 23 students, to allow one-on-one attention in-person and through online delivery. Of core curriculum surveyed, the program offered courses in 3/4 areas: crisis management, new/online media communications, and strategic communications. The program is the 15th most affordable of programs surveyed, coming in at $600 per credit hour.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $600
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 3/4

8.) National University

National University is a private, non-profit university with a main campus located in San Diego, California. Home to some 29,000 students, the university also have campuses through California, one in Nevada, and a large online presence. NU is particularly noted for its focus on vocational skills, as well as on adult students. This adult student focus is particularly evident through their online offerings, in which students can choose from a whopping 1,500 online courses. Degrees are available at the associates through masters levels, as well as teaching certifications. The university has a noted military presence, which comprises 9% of one of the largest student bodies of the United States. Other accolades include being one of the largest producers of teachers in the state of California, one of the largest graduaters of minority students in the United States, and being named one of the best universities to work for by the Chronicle of Higher Education.

The fully online Master of Arts in Strategic Communication offered by National University places highly in our ranking due to its affordable price point and coverage of major curriculum areas. Currently priced at $416 per credit hour, National University is the third most affordable program of those surveyed. The program covers three of the four major major curriculum areas, including strategic communication, crisis management, and research of audience. Additional flexibility may be gained in the program through electing to choose any graduate level course with the program (per approval of major faculty members). Additional support services include the third largest digital library in the United States, and an accelerated course format. Servicemembers recieve additional support as well as a tuition break.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $416
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 3/4

9.) Quincy University

Quincy University is a private Catholic, liberal arts university located in Quincy, Illinois. 1,100 students call QU home. Built in the Franciscan tradition, the school has been a practicioner of service learning since it’s inception in 1860. Academic offerings are primarily available at the undergraduate level with several exceptions including a Masters in Theology program, a Masters in Business Administration program, and a Master of Science in Education program. The University is known for its focus on education, instead of research, with an average class size of 15 students and a student/faculty ratio of 14 to 1. 70% of faculty at QU hold terminal degrees in their fields. QU is regionall accredited, as well as classified as a regionally ranked university by US News.

The fully online Master of Arts in Communication degree offered by Quincy University recieved top marks in our ranking due to its affordable price point and coverage of key curriculum areas. At $460 per credit hour, the university’s program is the fourth most affordable of those surveyed. Three of four core curriculum areas surveyed are covered in the degree plan, including Strategic Communication, New/Online Media, and Crisis Management. The overall focus of the program is to advance proficiency in writing as applied across media platforms, “leading to fluency in verbal, visual, and digital storytelling.” The degree offers courses in traditional 16-week increments, and may be pursued on a part-time or full-time basis.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $460
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 3/4

10.) Washington State University

Washington State University is a public research and land-grant University with a main campus located in Pullman, Washington. The University is the second largest in the state with almost 30,000 students systemwide. Over 200 fields of study are available at the bachelors through doctoral levels, including all major fields typically represented at large research institutions. Ranked as one of the 70 best public universities in the nation, WSU undergraduate business, international business, undergraduate engineering, and vetirenary programs are particularly well ranked. With $100’s of millions of dollars in research funding annually, the unviersity is annually in the 50 most research intensive universities in the United States. This amounts to many opportunities for students (even at the undergraduate level) to become involved with professor research.

The fully online Masters in Strategic Communication offered by Washington State University ranks highly among surveyed schools due to its affordable price point as well as its coverage of key curriculum areas. At $509 per credit hour, the university is the 9th most affordable of programs surveyed for out-of-state tuition. If you’re lucky enough to live in state, this price drops even more, making the program a steal from a top research university. Core curriculum areas covered by the degree include three of four surveyed: crisis management, new/online media communications, and strategic communication. A further selling point is the how up-to-date the degree is, teaching a host of modern platforms, softwares, and multimedia tools. By the end of the program, students have created a host of professional grade and peer-reviewed multimedia deliverables that may be stored online in a portfolio. Accolades of the program include being named one of the 25 best communications programs in the nation by the National Research Council.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $509
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 3/4

11.) American University

American University is a private research university located in Washington, D.C. Home to some 13,000 students, the University is affiliated with the United Methodist Church, though courses are secular. The University is known for a particularly politically active student body, as well as top notch academics and research. In line with its location and the political nature of the student body, the school has the largest school of international service in the nation. Other top ranked programs include the school of communication, international relations, and public affairs. In line with the many top ranked programs that may prepare students for non-profit or civil service work, the University has been noted as one of the ten top producers of future foreign policy workers in the United States. Another notable aspect of the University is it’s commitment to sustainability. Many LEED certified buildings, sustianable energy, and lack of waste led the university to be ranked #2 on the Sierra Club’s “Greenest Colleges in the US” in 2014.

The fully online Master of Arts in Strategic Commuication from American University is highly ranked due to its extremely flexible nature as well as its coverage of all core curriculum areas surveyed. The flexible nature of the degree may be seen from the range of specializations offered by this top ranked communications department. Concentrations may be used by students to tailor their degree to their unique interests and goals. For the strategic Communications degree, concentrations are available in advocacy and social impact, digital strategies and analytics, corporate communication and reputation management, and public diplomacy and global affairs. A second communications degree offers some online courses, and is centered around political communications. Even for online students, the number of D.C. connections the program may confer is a great boon for a budding communications professional. That coupled with a top department serving up classes in all of the core curriculum areas we surveyed makes for a great opportunity for ambitious communications professionals.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $1579
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Concentrations
  • Core Curriclum Score: 4/4

12.) Regent University

Regent University is a private Christian research university with a main campus located in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Home to some 8,000 students in-person and via distance learning, the university offers degrees at the associates through doctoral level. Originally founded as the Christian Broadcasting Network University, the school has historically been known as “the Harvard of the Christian Right.” Accordingly, recent surveys have ranked the school as having the 10th best faculty of schools in the nation, and as having the 2nd most conservative students in the nation. Among online providers, Regent shows out even more, ranked as the 11th best undergraduate online provider in the nation by US News, and with the best online MBA faculty in the nation. The univerity is also known as a particularly military friendly school, as well as having a quality financial aid system.

The M.A. in Strategic Communication offered fully online by Regent University places highly in our rankings due to solid rankings in all three categories, and particularly for coverage of all core curriculum areas surveyed. While the degree is open to those of all backgrounds and faiths, it’s particularly noted for its focus on providing Christian leaders with an enhanced ability to share their message and effectively impact attitudes and beliefs. The approved degree plan requires 33 credit hours for completion, including courses in crisis management, new/online media, strategic communication, and audience research. A capstone project is required, and students may choose between a thesis option and a directed project. While tuition is slightly pricier than some schools in our ranking, for one of the better private schools surveyed, still worth the plunge. Tuition per credit hour is currently set at $685 per credit hour.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $685
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 4/4

13.) Purdue University

Purdue University is a public land-grant, sea-grant, space-grant, research university located in West Lafayette, Indiana. The West Lafayette campus is the flagship campus of the Purdue University system and is home to some 40,000 students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Over 270 programs of study are available on campus, on what is the largest student body campus in Indiana as well as the largest international student body in the United States. Purdue is known for both undergraduate teaching as well as graduate-level research. Routinely ranked among the best schools in the nation for undergraduate teaching, the University prides itself on fostering individual achievement. To this point, an amazing 23 graduates have become astronauts, multiple Nobel Prize-winning graduates in physics and chemistry, three recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and many notable alumni in business and government. The university is also noted for its commitment to high quality affordable education, and has held its tuition flat instead of increasing it for the last few calendar years.

The fully online online Master of Science in Communication offered by Purdue University ranks highly due to good rankings across the board, and particularly among core curriculum areas covered. Core curriculum areas covered in the degree include crisis management, new/online media, strategic communications, and audience research. As with many universities with strong and accomplished alumni networks, Purdue’s communications program prides itself on connections students may make with organizations such as UNICEF, United Way, NCAA, Boeing, Coca-Cola, Time Warner Cable News, and John Deere among others. While slightly pricier than other options in our ranking, tuition per credit hour is reasonable at Purdue, one of the highest quality schools in our ranking. Tuition per credit hour is currently set at $731.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $731
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 4/4

14.) University of Alabama

The University of Alabama is a public, sea-grant, space-grant research university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The University was one of the first established on the –then– western frontier of the United States, and has had a large cultural influence on the region since its inception in 1820. Home to almost 40,000 students, the university is routinelly ranked as one of the 50 best public universities in the Nation, with particularly noted schools in law, business, nursing, and engineering. Also noteworthy is the University’s football team, one of the winningest in the history of college football, including recent national championships in 2015, 2012, 2011, and 2009. Bama by Distance, Alabama’s online offering branch provides a wide range of online offerings at the bachelors through doctoral levels with 47 fully online degrees at the present.

The fully online Master of Arts in Communication Studies with a concentration in leadership studies offered by University of Alabama ranks highly due to solid ranks in all three categories, and particularly affordability. Currently costing $367 per credit hour, this communications degree from a top school is definitely a steal. The program of study consists of 30 hours of study total, which may be completed in under two years by taking two courses at once. A capstone project is required and centers around the submission of a portfolio of communications work developed in conjunction with courses or an internship/work experience. Requirements for admission include a GRE or MAT score less than five years old and above 300 or 50th percentile, respectively. Also, an undergraduate GPA above 3.0 is required for admittance.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $367
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 2/4

15.) University of Nebraska

The University of Nebraska at Lincoln is a public, flagship, land-grant, and research university located in Lincoln, Nebraska. Home to some 25,000 students, the university is the oldest and largest in the University of Nebraska system. Over 150 courses of study are available at the university. The university has also long supported distane learning — particularly to support the education of those in rural areas through the mid and mountain west regions. Today online courses may be taken through this preeminent state university in a wide range of fields from the bachelors through doctoral levels. The largest share of online degrees, 46 in total, are available at the masters and doctoral levels. UNL’s online education programs are particularly highly regarded.

The fully online Master of Arts in Journalism and Mass Communication degree offered by the University of Nebraska ranks highly due to its flexibility and coverage of key curriculum areas. A number of specializations add to the degrees flexibility, including integrated media studies, media studies, and professional journalism. The three specializations focus on rapidly adapting media types for advertising and PR, the study of media in a scholarly context, and journalism, respectively. A thesis and non-thesis option are available, though may be dictated by what specialization students pursue. In additional to the regional accreditation of the larger university, the degree is also accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism & Mass Communications, the highest subject-specific form of accreditation for Communications degrees.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $990
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Specializations
  • Core Curriclum Score: 3/4

16.) Liberty University

Liberty University is a private, Christian, nonprofit, research University with a main campus located in Lynchburg, Virginia. Affiliated with the Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia, the University is the second great choice for students wanting to study in a Christian atmosphere in our list. LU is home to some 15,000+ students on campus, but combined with online learning is regularly hailed as the “largest Christian university in the world.” Over 100,000 students study online at Liberty University, which is particularly noted for programming for adult learners and servicemember support services. Accolades of the university include being a regionally ranked university, a top university for military servicemembers, one of the most conservative universities in America, and having ranked programs in business, criminal justice, and nursing.

The fully online Master of Arts in Communications offered by Liberty University ranks highly due to flexibility and affordability. With the cost per credit hour set at $565, the program is the 16th most affordable surveyed. As a private university, however, this is quite a good rate, and one that lowers even further for servicemembers and their family. Flexibility-granting components of the program include a generous transfer policy (up to 1/4th of the degree may be transferred in) as well as the ability to accelerate time until degree through intensives and life experience credits. This is a great way for those with experience in a given field to work their way through masters programming quickly. The program is both geared towards those seeking to pursue professional communications roles or head into research in the field.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $565
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Can Accelerate Degree
  • Core Curriclum Score: 1/4

17.) South Dakota State University

South Dakota State University is a public land-grant, sun-grant, space-grant research university with a main campus located in Brookings, South Dakota. The university is the state’s largest, with 12,000 students. Focus areas for the university include agriculture, engineering, nursing, and pharmacy, as well as the liberal arts. The university is classified as a very high research level university, particularly in math and applied sciences. 21 degree programs are available fully online, ranging from an associates degree to a large number of specialized masters programs. While tuition is generally affordable — even for out-of-state students — students from other great plains states can save even more at this well established research university. The student-faculty ratio at the university is low for a large university at 17:1, with over 30% of courses — particularly at the graduate level — consisting of less than 20 students.

The fully online Master of Mass Communication offered by South Dakota State University ranks highly due to the program’s affordability and flexibility. At $565 per credit hour, the program is the 12th most affordable of those surveyed. Course work for the degree is practical and skill based, with plenty of one-on-one attention from professors due to an average class size of only 15 students. Eight-week sessions allow students to pursue courses in shorter bursts if needed to balance work, school, and life responsibilities. By taking two courses at a time and one during each summer, student may graduate in two years time. New media and related tools are central to the program’s focus, making the program a great place for those potentially already in the field who would like to make sure their skills are up to date.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $565
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Accelerated Courses
  • Core Curriclum Score: 1/4

18.) Southern New Hampshire University

Southern New Hampshire University is a private, non-profit and non-sectarian university with a main campus located between Manchester and Hooksett, New Hampshire. Home to close to 3,000 students on campus, the university is largely known for its innovative online delivery, where over 60,000 students attend. As one would assume due to the size of the student body, a wide range of program types may be taken online, from the associates through doctoral levels. Innovative undergraduate offerings include accelerated 3-years honors degrees in business, criminal justice, and writing. Through the College Unbound program, students may obtain credit through apprenticeships, project learning, and group exercises, and accelerate their degree by spending some time online and some time in-person. The university is regularly regaled as potentially the most innovative university in America by the likes of Fast Company and US News. In line with SNHU’s dedication to doing things their own way, they have been carbon neutral since 2007 (the earliest university in their state to become so), and are regularly listed as one of the best universities to work for in America.

The fully online Master of Arts in Communication offered by Southern New Hampshire University ranks highly due to its flexibility and affordability. Flexibility-enhancing components of the program include the ability for students to pursue three concentrations: health communication, new media & marketing, and public relations. Furthermore, time until degree may be accelerated for students who push through multiple 10-week classes at once. This enables students to graduate in as few as 15 months. A further flexibility-enhancing program element is the ability to apply without taking the GRE or GMAT. As the 18th most affordable program of those surveyed, Southern New Hampshire University ranks well in affordability for a private university.

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  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $627
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: Concentrations
  • Core Curriclum Score: 1/4

19.) Stevenson University

Stevenson University is a private coeducational university located in the Greenspring Area of Baltimore County, Maryland. Historically a two-year college, Stevenson University expanded in 2007 to attain the university status, opening up new colleges of business and leadership, and design. A new school of education is also slated to open in the coming years. The university operates according to a unique career-centered angle called “career architecture.” Career architecture involves a liberal arts core curriculum paired with a career emphasis. Throughout their schooling, students develop practical skills, resumes, get hands-on practice, and have a number of opportunities for interviews, internships, or apprenticeships. The university is currently home to over 4,000 students, including several hundred non-traditional adult learners.

The fully online Masters in Communication Studies is offered through Stevenson University’s graduate and professional studies school. The program places in our ranking due to strong showings in the core curriculum covered and affordable price point. Currently three of four core curriculum areas surveyed are available through the Stevenson University program, including crisis management, Strategic Communications, and audience research. Students may select between a capstone project and a thesis. The following aspects of communication are taught and may be integrated into the culiminating project or thesis: Interpersonal, Intercultural, Organizational, Nonverbal, Conflict Resolution, Small Group, Rhetorical and Speech. All department faculty members have terminal degrees in their field. The current tuition per credit hour for the program is $670, quite affordable for a graduate level program at a private university.

  • Homepage
  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $670
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 3/4

20.) Park University

Park University is a private university with a flagship campus located in Parkville, Missouri. The university, founded in 1875, has around 1,600 students who attend the main campus, however there are satallite campuses and online programming options which swell the student body to 23,000 students. PU has been noted as one of the most affordable private schools in the nation. The university has also recieved extensive recognition for its ability to support and cater to the needs of both adult non-traditional students and servicemember students. To this aim, many of the satalitte campuses of PU are located near military bases throughout the nation. A military degree completion program was initially established as far back as 1972, and grew when the university was an early adopter of online education in 1996. Park University is regionally accredited — the highest form of accreditation — across all 40 of its campuses as well as online.

The fully online Master of Arts in Communication and Leadership offered by Park University places in our ranking due to its strong scores in affordability and core curriculum areas covered. As previously mentioned, Park U as a whole is known for being one of the most affordable private schools in the nation. In our ranking, the school rates as the 9th most affordable program of those surveyed, both public and private. Flexibility-enhancing components of the program include the ability to take courses as needed in-person and online, as well as a variety of term lengths even for the same course. While attending in-person is often much more of a stretch for universities with one or fewer locations, Park University is located across the nation, making it easier to become a hybrid student if needed. Other noteworthy components of the program include the strong international student base, as well as small classes that aid in the providing of one-on-one attention.

  • Homepage
  • Estimated Tuition Per Credit Hour: $535
  • Flexibility-Enhanding Components: N/A
  • Core Curriclum Score: 2/4

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Interview: What Leonard Kim Can Teach Us About Self-Taught Marketing, Personal Branding, and Contentious Marketing http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/interview-leonard-kim-can-teach-us-self-taught-marketing-personal-branding-contentious-marketing/ Mon, 13 Mar 2017 22:17:56 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=980 Q: You’re a highly talented writer and skilled speaker, which are essential skills for digital marketers and online learners. Where did you learn to write so well, and how much […]

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Q: You’re a highly talented writer and skilled speaker, which are essential skills for digital marketers and online learners. Where did you learn to write so well, and how much of what you know about marketing communication is learned through experience (the best teacher), self-taught (the second-best teacher, especially when it comes to online learning), or more formal education (which is full of great teachers)?

Answer:

I always liked writing, but I really was never good at it. In high school, I would get C’s in English but it was weird. When I wrote an essay for a friend who went to a different school, she got an A. Regardless, some people told me my writing sucked so I stopped for a long time. Then around half a decade or more ago, I started reading Copyblogger.

After reading Copyblogger, I tried writing copy for some of the startups I worked with. It did decently and brought in new business. But I felt I wasn’t good enough to write for myself. So I figured I needed to better improve my writing style. Then after I broke my ankle in 2012 and had a lot of time at home to myself, I practiced writing on Facebook to my network of friends. I started to get around 10 likes a post and comments about how people didn’t realize these stories about my life happened to me. But my writing was still a bit convoluted at the time and it wasn’t as clear as it could be.

So what I did is I took some of my favorite authors, like Malcolm Gladwell and James Altucher, and wrote their books and articles down word for word. This subconsciously helped me figure out their writing styles and why they wrote certain words at certain points in a sentence. On top of that, I started to write how I talked, so my message wouldn’t be bogged down with internal thoughts that wouldn’t make it into a live conversation with a close friend.

After I did this, when I went back to write my own content, it improved significantly. It was easier to read because it was written at a lower grade level, which could be understood globally, even in non native English speaking communities. This helped propel my content to be read over 2 million times within the first six months, and 10 million times within 1.5 years.

I took a few writing classes in college along the way, but the majority of what I learned was self-taught and through experience.

Q: You’re also a personal branding expert with a lot of excellent advice about brand personalization, as well as an inspiring personal story that many tend to think of as a “rags to riches” tale about the fulfillment of the American Dream. How can digital marketers and lifelong learners personalize their online educations in a way that can make their story stand out like yours?

   

Answer:

No one cares what you do until they know who you are first. When I used to do sales, this was the process:

Step 1: Meet and Greet (Hi, it’s a pleasure to meet you! My name is Leonard, and you are?) Step 2. Sell Yourself (Asking questions to find common ground) Step 3. Sell Your Company (Features, Functions, Benefits) Step 4. Qualify (Find budget, etc.) And so forth.

When you have in person conversations with someone, it’s pretty easy to sell yourself. You can ask someone questions like what they do for fun, if they have a family, what their favorite travel destinations are, if they went on a vacation recently and so forth. All these questions help you figure out how you can find a moment where you say ‘me too!’ and start a conversation based off of something you mutually enjoy.

The problem with being online is that you can’t ask people these questions. I mean you could, but you wouldn’t be able to see a response in a video or an article. So what you need to do instead is highlight your interests and hobbies so when other people see you speak about these traits, they can say ‘me too!’ in their head.

That instantaneous connection only happens when you present who you are first. The best way to do this is to create your own personal story.

But how much of your story should you tell?

If you are rummaging through your story and you find something that scares you, you should use that fear as an indicator that you are onto something great. So many people are scared to talk about what they are scared of, for fear of being judged or looked down upon. But these fears are what you talk about when you meet a friend and ask them for sincere advice. And they usually respond back with a similar story of what they experienced themselves. And when you are finished with the conversation, the bond between you two more often than not becomes closer, because you two feel like you can trust each other.

The same thing happens online, but at a much larger scale. When you share what you are scared to talk about, that vulnerability and authenticity gives you the ability to make an instant connection with your audience.

Q: Our State of Marketing Education found that online marketing is becoming more contentious, largely due to the prevalence of Donald Trump and political conversations on almost all channels over the past two years, which have taught us, to quote the article, “that saying something contentious gets attention, and that making a bold statement — whether it be in reference to current affairs, pop culture, or fellow competitors– while also taking a big risk, can result in a huge reward, even in a brand name is attached to the perceived winner.” How can online learners or digital marketers enter this contentious scene and learn to harness it to their benefit?

Answer:

To be contentious, you need to be bold. You will get backlash. You will get personal attacks. And you will not be liked for your statement.

The numbers aren’t exact, but chances are, 50 percent of the people you encounter will feel strongly in favor of what you are saying, while 50 percent of the people you encounter will feel strongly against what you are saying. When you alienate one audience, you make the other audience stronger. So what happens is you get loyal followers to your marketing message, while at the same time, people who absolutely hate it.

The first thing you need to do is realize that when you make a decision to do contentious marketing, you can’t back down from it. You have to go all in.

The second thing you need to do is be as strategic as possible. Think through the campaign from front to end. Is what you are saying going to offend your target market? What benefits will you gain? How will the message be communicated in the mainstream media?

The third thing you need to do is come up with multiple concepts of the same message.

Once you have these, you will be able to run them by your peers and people outside of your industry to see how they react to the content. Most importantly, you need to get some samples of reactions from the other side. If you aren’t getting enough of a positive reaction, and tend to be getting more of the wrong reaction from the other side where they can use the message against you, then chances are, the campaign will backfire.

After you find the campaign that touches the right emotions on your target audience, then launch it. But be prepared to take your personal emotions out of the campaign, because there will be messages from all angles, both in favor and against what you are communicating. And your job after the campaign is launched is to amplify your message, not to enter into a battle against what others are saying. So ignore the hate and amplify your contentious message even further.

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What Do Colors Tell Us About an Industry? [Infographic and Interview] http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/colors-tell-us-industry-infographic-interview/ Tue, 07 Mar 2017 20:56:32 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=948 We’ve published an infographic and a ranking about neuromarketing before, but we’d never seen what first appeared to be a combination infographic and ranking like this one. That was until […]

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We’ve published an infographic and a ranking about neuromarketing before, but we’d never seen what first appeared to be a combination infographic and ranking like this one.

That was until Builtvisible’s Edna Oliveros cued us to the fact that it wasn’t a ranking, but more of a spectrum, along which fall some of the most popular brand colors used by the World’s Biggest Public Companies. Thanks to market- and industry-specific research from experts at Towergate Insurance, we are now able to see brand color distributions across the logos of some of the top 20 brands from 26 global industries: that’s an analysis of 520 company logos! Enthralled by what this may tell us about the emotional response certain industries want from their consumers, we sat across the screen from Edna and asked her a couple questions about the big takeaways her infographic might lend us as students of marketing. Check out the infographic first and then our interview below for our Q&A.

Infographic from Towergate Insurance

Interview

BMD: Who were you hoping to reach most with Colour in Branding?

EO: We want to reach people from the marketing industry in general with an interest in neuromarketing and marketing science. Also, we would like to bring this knowledge to people who actively work in creative pieces, so they can develop better concepts.

BMD: What is the main takeaway you’d want online marketing educators and learners to have from this infographic specifically, and Builtvisible more generally?

EO: As mentioned previously, we would like people to identify tendencies and understand the marketing logic of different industries. This research and marketing exercise considers each industry and highlights some coincidences that hopefully will guide designers, marketers and business owners to develop better logos according with their sectors.

BMD: Could you offer any explanation as to why certain industries show more or less brand color differentiation than others in order to rank among the Top 20? For instance, industries like Specialized Chemicals, Home Improvement, and Broadcasting and Cable seem to have more color differentiation in branding than say, Restaurants, Apparel and Accessories, or Banking. Could such differentiation have anything to do with the perceived complexity of the products being marketed within each industry? Or perhaps it’s just the newness or oldness of the industry, with old timer businesses in the industry having had their pick of primary colors early on, while newcomer businesses are forced to differentiate themselves, dichromatically or otherwise, later on? Or perhaps the explanation is more psychological since a lot of roads tend to lead back to neuromarketing?

EO: It depends on all factors. As the infographic explains, if you look at the food and beverage sectors, their logos are more visible and show more energy. These companies interact daily with people. However, banks and airlines should be reliable and offer confidence to its clients. These qualities are represented in the blue colour. We are not 100% sure if this tendency is balanced and applies to all companies, but that is what the chart evidences.

However, a brand logo depends of the owners of each company because they are the ones who decide what they really want to communicate.

Thanks for the infographic and interview, Edna!

If you have any additional questions for BestMarketingDegrees.org or Edna, drop us a line at j.r.jacksonian@gmail.com

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The 50 Best Scholarships for Marketing Students http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/50-best-scholarships-marketing-students/ Thu, 02 Mar 2017 22:34:34 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=944 In 2016, marketers made 3.8% more than they did in 2015—an increase which follows a general hike in marketing budgets across the board last year. As job opportunities expand to […]

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In 2016, marketers made 3.8% more than they did in 2015—an increase which follows a general hike in marketing budgets across the board last year. As job opportunities expand to meet demand for more marketers to fill positions in better-funded marketing departments, so too does the number of educational opportunities that are designed to help marketers reach their career goals. And as these educational opportunities expand, funding opportunities designed to help marketers meet their educational goals has also become increasingly important.

Scholarships can mean the difference between getting paid to earn an education and paying for it on down the line. They can mean the difference between feeling a sense of consumer confidence, or a sense of buyer’s regret. But best of all, they can mean a chance at debt free graduation.

Using the scholarship database, Unigo to help us curate scholarships that are tailor-made for marketers who are pursuing undergraduate and graduate degrees in marketing today, we’ve assembled a list of the 50 Best Scholarships for Marketers in 2017 so that we can help our learners come as close as possible to debt-free graduation. We’ve separated our list into 5 lists:

  • (1) Scholarships suited for learners pursuing a bachelor’s degree in marketing
  • (2) Scholarships suited for learners pursuing a master’s or MBA in marketing
  • (3) Scholarships suited for learners pursuing EITHER a bachelor’s or a master’s degree in marketing
  • (4) Scholarships suited for learners who are women, minorities, or people with disabilities who are pursuing a degree in marketing
  • (5) Scholarships that are different but relevant to students pursuing a degree in marketing.

All scholarships on these lists are prioritized according to the dates their applications are due by, with scholarship applications that are due sooner appearing before those that are due later.

If you have any questions regarding this list, our methodology, or organization more generally, please contact us.

For Bachelor’s in Marketing

Marketing EDGE Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Participants in at least one Marketing EDGE program, have minimum GPA of 3.0 or higher, have demonstrated interest in Marketing, and pursuing a related major
    • Amount: $1,000-$7,000
    • Date to Apply by: anytime; rolling submission opens in February, scholarship awarded in December

Thomas G. Labreque Smart Start Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Residents of New York who are interested in majoring in Business and Marketing
    • Amount: Full tuition and stipend
    • Date to Apply by: February 8th

James A. Turner, Jr. Memorial Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Full-time students, in pursuit of four-year degree in business, have employment at and intend to seek a managerial career in welding store operations or distributorship
    • Amount: $3,500
    • Date to Apply by: February 15th

Knoxville Business Association Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Resident of Knox County, TN who is graduating from public or private high school in Knox County, pursuing business-related degree, enrolled full-time at UT-Knoxville, have demonstrated financial need
    • Amount: $2,500
    • Date to Apply by: February 15

Harry A. Finkelman Scholarship Fund

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: High school senior in Madison, Middleton, or Monroe Ohio, 3.0 GPA, plan to major in business with preference given to real estate
    • Amount: $2,500
    • Date to Apply by: February 15th

Tortoise Young Entrepreneurs Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Permanent residents or university students in Kansas or Missouri, enrolled in or plan to enroll in full-time undergraduate course of study towards bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.30 or higher, ACT of 24 or higher, or SAT of 1680 or higher
    • Amount: $3,000
    • Date to Apply by: February 29th

Chicago Roofing Contractors Association

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: High school seniors, accepted for full-time enrollment at four-year accredited college or university, US citizen residing in Cook County, Illinois and neighboring counties, ACT of 29 or higher
    • Amount: $4,000
    • Date to Apply by: March 3

Harry and Joyce Wachter Business Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Residents from Osprey to Boca Raton, Florida, enrolled at a college or university, pursuing studies in a field of business administration, GPA of 2.50 or higher, have demonstrated financial need, US citizen
    • Amount: $1,850
    • Date to Apply by: March 6

Cecile Meyer Frampton/Cornhusker Bank Scholarship for Lincoln Northeast High School

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: High school seniors at Lincoln Northeast High School, plan to attend college in Nebraska, interest in business, participate in extracurricular activities, GPA of 2.50 or higher, have demonstrated financial need
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: March 15

George A. Frampton/Cornhusker Bank Lincoln High School Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: High school seniors at Lincoln High School, plan to attend college in Nebraska, interest in business, participate in extracurricular activities, 2.50 GPA or higher, have demonstrated financial need
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: March 15

Gene Shay Memorial Scholarship Fund

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US citizen, graduating from any high school in Yuma County, planning to major in business or related field at an Arizona university
    • Amount: $750
    • Date to Apply by: March 27

National Society of High School Scholars Foundation Business, Economics, and Public Policy Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: GPA of 3.0 or higher, pursuing degree in or closely related to Business/Business Administration, Finance/Economics, Public Policy
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: April 1

SLS Consulting Scholarship Application Form

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US citizens with high school diploma from 2014-2015 school year, current students at four-year accredited college or university, current students at two-year institution with intent to transfer to four-year college or university, pursuing degree in marketing, business administration, writing, design, or computer science, GPA of 3.0 or higher
    • Amount: $500
    • Date to Apply by: April 15

TableLegsOnline Future Entrepreneurs of American Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: graduating high school seniors, accepted to accredited US college or university, seeking business-related degree, US resident or hold a valid US student visa, GPA of 3.0 or higher
    • Amount: $500
    • Date to Apply by: May 1

American Advertising Federation of New Mexico Pam Schneider Memorial Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: New Mexico residents, enrolled full-time as a junior or senior in New Mexico four-year nonprofit or public educational institution, pursuing degree in business with a marketing emphasis, journalism with an advertising emphasis, strategic communications, advertising and marketing, graphic design, fine art, photography, or illustration with focus on advertising or public relations, GPA of 3.0 or higher, have only one semester left to complete degree
    • Amount: $1,500
    • Date to Apply by: June 9

10x Digital Marketing Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: High school seniors, college undergraduates, want to pursue major in a field related to digital marketing, must be enrolled in at least 10 credit hours
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: June 30

The Yellow Pages United Mark Smith Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US citizens, want to pursue major in marketing, graphic design, or related majors, enrolled full-time at accredited college or university in the United States, GPA of 3.0 or higher
    • Amount: $2,000
    • Date to Apply by: July 29

For Master’s or MBA in Marketing

Mary Elizabeth Lockwood Beneventi MBA Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: full-time MBA graduate students, GPA of 3.25 or higher
    • Amount: $2,000
    • Date to Apply by: February 10th

GMAT Tutor Brightest Minds MBA Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: any student pursuing an MBA at 1 of 15 sponsoring business schools
    • Amount: $25,000
    • Date to Apply by: April 25

Tutor the People Pre-MBA Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: undergraduate students in business, intent to pursue an MBA
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: May 15

MBA Scholarships Essay Contest

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Legal US residents 18 years or older, currently enrolled in a masters business program by 08/31/2018; EducationDynamics employees, officers, directors, agents and their relatives are not eligible
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: May 31

For Either Bachelor’s or Master’s in Marketing

Reading-Berks Association of Realtors Scholarship Fund

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: High school seniors located in Berks County or Reading, Pennsylvania, continuing education in a business program
    • Amount: $500
    • Date to Apply by: March 15

AfterCollege Business Student Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Students enrolled and working toward a degree (AA, AS, BA, BS, MS, PhD) in any field of business, 3.0 GPA or higher
    • Amount: $500
    • Date to Apply by: March 31

AfterCollege Sales & Marketing Student Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Students enrolled and working towards a bachelor’s or master’s degree, interested in a future career in sales or marketing, 3.0 GPA or higher
    • Amount: $500
    • Date to Apply by: March 31

Directive Consulting Search to Learn Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: high school senior or college student, active .edu email address, and expressed interest in Digital Marketing
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: May 14

BuyerSynthesis Marketing Research Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: high school senior or college undergraduate pursuing four-year or advanced degree, pursuing career in marketing, marketing research, business, economics, or social sciences, US resident
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: May 15

Public Relations Student Society Gary Yoshimura Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: members of the Public Relations Student Society, pursuing higher education in public relations, GPA of 3.0 or higher, have demonstrated financial need
    • Amount: $2,400
    • Date to Apply by: May 26

ProjectManager.com Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Permanent US residents 18 years or older, enrolled in a two-, four-, or graduate program, proof of enrollment
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: June 1

Rapid Formations Entrepreneur Scholarship Program

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Secured enrollment at recognized institution of higher learning in the UK or US, have demonstrated entrepreneurial attitude and leadership, have demonstrated financial need
    • Amount: $750
    • Date to Apply by: August 25

Lead Roster B2B Sales & Marketing Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Any and all students studying in the fields of business, marketing, computer science, communications, or IT
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: December 20

For Women, Minorities, and People with Disabilities in Marketing

Louis F. Cox Memorial – AK Steel African American Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: African American, high school senior in Butler and Warren Ohio area, attend accredited US college or university
    • Amount: $5,000
    • Date to Apply by: February 15th

Business Plan Scholarship for Students with Disabilities

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Students enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate degree program at an accredited American college, university or trade school; documented disability
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: April 1

Matt Fong Asian Americans in Public Finance Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: California college sophomores, juniors or seniors enrolled at four-year colleges and universities, major in accounting, political science, public policy, business administration or related fields, Asian heritage (at least 50%), GPA of 3.0 or higher, demonstrated financial need
    • Amount: $2,500
    • Date to Apply by: April 3

CREW Network Foundation Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: women pursuing university-level education that will lead to careers in commercial real estate
    • Amount: $5,000
    • Date to Apply by: April 30

National Association for Women in Construction Margaret Powell Scholarsip

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US women residing in Lake, Seminole, Orange and Osceola counties of Florida, attending accredited Florida institution of higher learning, enrolled in course of study related to the construction industry, demonstrated financial need
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: May 6

Floyd Mayweather Jr. Foundation Advancement of Women in Sports & Entertainment Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Women, US citizens, enrolled full-time at a four-year accredited university, pursuing degree in public relations, communication, media studies, marketing, or journalism, have desire to work in entertainment or sport industries, have demonstrated financial need
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: June 15

Women in Marketing Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Women, GPA of 3.0 or higher, want to pursue major in communications or career in marketing and advertising
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: July 1

Different but Relevant to Marketing

Parlin Law Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US citizens, between 17 and 50 years of age, full or part-time college student, valid email address
    • Amount: $500
    • Date to Apply by: anytime; rolling submission, biannual acceptance

Government Finance and Professional Development Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US or Canadian citizens, part-time graduate students, have two years employment by one or more state or local governments, have employer and advisor recommendations, haven’t ever won GFOA scholarship
    • Amount: $9,000
    • Date to Apply by: February 10th

BBB Northwest Students of Integrity Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: high school juniors and seniors residing in Alaska, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Washington, or western Wyoming
    • Amount: $10,000
    • Date to Apply by: February 13th

Bob Edge Scholarship Fund

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US citizen, employed real estate professional in good standing, three years experience in commercial real estate, Dallas-Ft. Worth area preferred
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: February 15th

ZipRecruiter Scholarship Challenge

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: College or university student, 2.5 GPA, authorized to work in United States, creative cover letter
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: February 25th

Clay County Bar Association Scholarship Program

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: graduating high school seniors who are residents of Clay County, Florida and plan to pursue a career in law or business.
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: March 1

Sylvan Landau Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Graduating seniors in Dallas, Tarrant, Collin, or Denton counties in Texas, GPA of 2.75 or higher, SAT of 1500 or higher, ACT of 22 or higher, US citizens
    • Amount: $5,000
    • Date to Apply by: April 1

George L. Patt Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US veterans, Illinois residents, pursuing undergraduate or continuing education in field of real estate
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: April 1

Access Missouri Financial Assistance Program

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US citizens who are both permanent residents and Missouri residents, undergraduate students enrolled full-time at participating Missouri schools, expected family contribution of $12,000 or less, filed FAFSA
    • Amount: $4,600
    • Date to Apply by: April 1

CARiD Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: students between 16 and 20 years old, enrolled in college or university for upcoming semester, not a CARiD employee or related to CARiD employee
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: April 30

Joe Perdue Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: US and international undergraduate sophomores, juniors, and seniors currently attending accredited four-year college or university, pursuing managerial careers in private club industry, and GPA of 2.5 or higher
    • Amount: $1,800
    • Date to Apply by: May 1

Crown & Caliber Entrepreneur’s Scholarship

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Any and all students who submit a business plan
    • Amount: $1,000
    • Date to Apply by: May 31

The Tremblant Sunstrat Annual $500 Scholarship Contest

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Any and all students who submit an essay that most successfully markets the travel destination of Mont Tremblant
    • Amount: $500
    • Date to Apply by: July 29

Clubs of America Scholarship Award for Career Success

  • Description
    • Who is eligible: Any and all current students at accredited US colleges or universities with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher
    • Amount: $1,500
    • Date to Apply by: August 31

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Editor’s Choice: The 10 Best Books on Marketing Of All Time http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/editors-choice-10-best-books-marketing-time/ Thu, 02 Mar 2017 22:24:46 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=929 When most people think of the term “marketing,” words like “staying power” don’t usually also come to mind. That’s because, aside from some painful experiments with infomercials that may prove […]

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When most people think of the term “marketing,” words like “staying power” don’t usually also come to mind. That’s because, aside from some painful experiments with infomercials that may prove to live in infamy, many company’s marketing messages fall by the wayside. From slogans like Apple’s “Think Different” and Mountain Dew’s “Do the Dew”, to the cigarette industry’s Marlboro Man and Joe Camel, marketing methods and messages tend to be moving targets that are hard for writers to hit with any consistency, much less publish books about. But against all odds, there are some books on marketing that have stood the test of time. To find these books, we think, would be to find the best books on marketing of all time. We also think we’ve found them in the ranking that appears below.

To compile this ranking, we sifted through 1000 books that were shelved under “all books” for the search term “marketing” on the popular reader review site, Goodreads. We handpicked the 215 with the highest ratings, stars, and number of published editions, then scored them according to their average number of stars out of five; the total number of ratings each book has received; and the number of editions published per year since the book’s initial publication. Only the highest rated, most rated, and most published books rose to the top of our list. See if you recognize some of the titles. Whether you’re one of our many self-taught marketers who’ve Googled “marketing books,” or a seasoned marketing professional who’s looking for a definitive list of some of the best reads of all time, we bet you’ll recognize at least one title, perhaps even several that you’ve read yourself.

1. Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

First published in 1937, Think and Grow Rich is often thought of as the grandfather of modern motivational literature. Authored by famed American author and business philosopher, Napoleon Hill, Think and Grow Rich is widely considered one of the best books ever published on success. Why? Well, it helped Hill’s authority that he was an advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt from 1933 to 1936, as well as the fact that the book itself was highly popular, selling over 20 million copies before Hill’s death in 1970. But the book arguably enjoyed such high levels of popularity because Hill spent much of his life studying and demystifying the mystique of the successful American businessmen whom he used as case examples in the book. These businessmen include Andrew Carnegie, Thomas Edison, and Henry Ford, all of whose lives and business practices model principles of success that still resonate with modern marketers today. Indeed, much of Hill’s own advice on the “way of success”—that it is the same as “the way of continuous pursuit of knowledge”—echoes loud and clear through the halls of business history, where it reaches the ears of marketers in the information age.

2. Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable by Seth Godin

First published in 2003, Purple Cow is a definitive work on contemporary marketing by the prolific Seth Godin, who explains where the genius of great marketing begins—in the remarkable. Using the analogy of a Purple Cow, Godin uses this book to illustrate how businesses like Apple, Krispy Kreme, and JetBlue manage to stand out as somehow more special, phenomenal, and otherwise more preferable to their competitors. Much of the remarkability Godin points out can be traced back to the principle of memorability: we don’t forget the brands that stand out as “intrinsically different” from their peers. This is especially true of brands that make us stop and consider why the brand owner chose a distinctive name; that is, brands with intrigue tend to attract more customers than those without intrigue. Staying true to its name, however intriguing branding is only the tip of the iceberg for The Purple Cow. In fact, much of the book is spent explaining how the field of marketing changed as we entered the twenty-first century, as well as how we can adapt to a business and marketing environment that increasingly demands difference over similarity.

3. The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: Violate Them at Your Own Riskby Al Ries and Jack Trout

First published in 1993, The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing is a business book co-authored by award-winning, thought-leading, and American marketing professionals, Al Ries and Jack Trout. 22 Immutable Laws takes as its premise the idea that every discipline has its laws. Physics has gravity. Geology has time. Governments have taxes. Marketing is little different. Although there may not be a single law that unites the entire practice, the discipline can be characterized as governed by twenty-two laws. Taken together, these laws and the way that brands choose to follow them (or not follow them) determine a brand’s place within the popular imagination. Not following these laws doesn’t mean a brand will necessarily fail, it just means they might occupy a different place in the public perception, because as Trout and Ries argue, “Marketing is a battle of perceptions, not products.” That means brands who break the laws are courting a high risk of failure, hence the subtitle “Violate Them at Your Own Risk.” But what makes this book one of the greatest marketing books of all time isn’t the fact that its lays down the law. It’s that it teases out the unspoken rules marketers operate by, so that in knowing them, we might bend them to our advantage, and possibly reap a reward.

4. The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles from the World’s Greatest Manufacturer by Jeffrey K. Liker

First published in 2001, The Toyota Way is a business book about the Japanese industrial giant, Toyota. Written by Dr. Jeffrey K. Liker, a professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan, Toyota Way is a veritable testament to how and why Toyota became the most consistently exemplary car manufacturer in the world. Dr. Liker takes the book to walk us through the management principles that underly the company’s most successful business practices. The most important of these principles is the “Lean Production” model, which if followed, can simultaneously improve the speed of a business’s processes and product service quality while also cutting costs. And all this across industry boundaries. Having interviewed Toyota executives and compared their methods to other manufacturers, Dr. Liker’s and his book are go-to resources for marketers from any industry who are looking for ways to pitch a guaranteed product, as well as learn how quality control can be the ultimate tool in a marketer’s belt.

5. Selling the Invisible: A Field Guide to Modern Marketing by Harry Beckwith

First published in 1997, Selling the Invisible is a book of advice for how to sell a service to prospective clients who, in this day and age, we won’t see before they see us. Written by Harry Beckwith, the leader of a marketing firm who advises over twenty Fortune 200 companies, Selling the Invisible comes from a place of both principle and practice. That is, because Beckwith has spent much of his career selling both his own services and the services of others rather than products, he is uniquely fit to provide advice on how to sell what initially seems invisible to clients: subjective expertise. In a day and age where software as a service (Saas) has entered into the forefront of sales and marketing, Beckwith’s book was in many ways ahead of its time in extolling the values and virtues of selling services rather than goods. Indeed, with advice like “Building your brand doesn’t take millions. It takes imagination,” Beckwith nails the crux of the creative, service-driven economy that has enjoyed such a surge in the age of the Internet.

6. Permission Marketing: Turning Strangers Into Friends and Friends into Customers by Seth Godin

First published in 1999, Permission Marketing is the second business book written by the marketing author and information entrepreneur, Seth Godin. An expert on the notion of marketing as part science, part art, Godin wrote the book for startup entrepreneurs to not only navigate the changing landscape of modern marketing, but command it. Having started his career well before the content boom, Godin describes a shift that began during the late 1990s, when old school, “Interruption Marketing” (think: TV ads and phone calls) started being replaced by “Permission Marketing,” which sought to offer consumers both an option and an incentive to shift their attention to listen to a brand message. All of Godin’s advice goes towards teaching us that in order to increase our chances of making a sale, we have to change the way we market. We have to show we care more about our consumer’s time, trust, and relationship to us than we do about their taking their money. It’s safe to say that in 1999, this book was way ahead of its time, as its ideas characterize the inbound marketing revolution we’ve witnessed in recent years.

7. Go Pro: 7 Steps to Becoming a Network Marketing Professional by Eric Worre

First published in 2013, Go Pro is a business and self help book written by Eric Worre, a former corporate employee who went into network marketing to spread the good news and never looked back. The product of Worre’s sales and marketing encounters with hundreds of thousands of people around the globe, Go Pro provides a comprehensive view of the network marketing industry, from finding prospects to presenting a product, from helping prospects become self-employed distributors to growing a sales team. Network marketers often sing Worre’s praise for helping them turn what was just an extra of income into a full-fledged career and valuable asset. But the book isn’t just about money. It’s even more about the mentality that it takes to educate customers by telling and selling the story of both a product and a company. And as the most popular book to emerge in recent years about the increasingly popular, albeit slightly controversial industry of network marketing, Go Pro represents its trade well on a list that would be remiss without a book about its unique brand of marketing.

8. The New Rules of Marketing & PR: How to Use Social Media, Online Video, Mobile Applications, Blogs, News Releases, & Viral Marketing to Reach Buyers Directly by David Meerman Scott

First published in 2007, The New Rules of Marketing & PR is a business book written by a “recovering VP of marketing” and content entrepreneur, David Meerman Scott. Published in over 26 languages and to much applause at the beginning of the content boom that was the late 2000s, New Rules of Marketing & PR has been praised as “the benchmark guide to marketing and PR.” Scott explains the importance of search engine optimization, as well as how businessmen and businesswomen can use the power of gripping content across all channels with an integrated marketing strategy to fully participate in the content marketing economy we have today. With his casual, sincere, and authorial voice, Scott draws on over 20 years of experience as a marketing and PR entrepreneur to impress upon his audience that they don’t have to spend beaucoup bucks on expensive ad campaigns. All they really need is the patience and willingness to try following the new rules of marketing and PR, which like the field of real estate might be summarized in three words: reach, reach, reach.

9. All Marketers Are Liars: The Power of Telling Authentic Stories in a Low-Trust World by Seth Godin

First published in 2005, All Marketers Are Liars is the tenth business book written by marketing author and information entrepreneur, Seth Godin. All Marketers Are Liars takes as its premise the idea that all marketers are liars. The best marketers, however, we don’t view as liars, but as storytellers whom we believe. The reasons for our believing a story are often different, but the best storytellers know what their audiences want to see and believe, and they deliver a tale that fits their audience’s narrative of what is true. We recognize the worst storytellers as liars and frauds, and we tend not to buy their products, services, or ideas because they appear inauthentic, or worse, of no value. Often viewed as Godin’s most accessible marketing masterpiece, All Marketers Are Liars teaches readers not just how to sell things that people need, but to create things that people want. Its ingenuity comes from this fact, as well as the fact that it models the marketing methods that it’s selling in the most authentic way it possibly can—by telling the stories.

10. Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger

First published in 2013 and having already been released in eight other editions, Contagious is written by Jonah Berger, a professor of marketing at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. Contagious takes on some of marketing’s biggest questions: What makes things popular? Why do people talk about certain products and ideas more than others? Why are some stories and rumors more infectious? And what makes online content go viral? Berger’s answers to these questions hinge on social influence, or the idea that valued input we receive from those around us often has more impact on our decision to spread certain products, thoughts, and stories than our individual preference for those products, thoughts, and ideas. Berger elaborates on this theory of social influence with of six principles that may be said to drive all sorts of things to catch on and spread contagiously. This accessible and authoritative explication of consumer behavior is what makes Contagious one of the best marketing books of all time.

Josh Jackson is Contributing Editor of BestMarketingDegrees.org, a growing resource for online learners, educators, and marketers in between.

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What we can learn from SuperBowl Ads in 2017 (the ten best takeaways) http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/can-learn-superbowl-ads-2017-ten-best-takeaways/ Thu, 02 Mar 2017 00:33:51 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=924 We’ve come a long way since burping frogs and “whazzup” defined Super Bowl advertisements, and thus, American culture. In today’s market, a Super Bowl spot costs $5 million for a […]

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We’ve come a long way since burping frogs and “whazzup” defined Super Bowl advertisements, and thus, American culture. In today’s market, a Super Bowl spot costs $5 million for a one-off, and corporations have ever-evolving technology to identify, target and destroy niche demographics with the products, services and lifestyles that speak directly to them. This year, a team that prizes cheating and both blessed and received blessings from Donald Trump faced off against a city that has never won a Super Bowl, but commands music, slang and fashion tastes of the nation. In a cruel twist of fate, the latter team led by 25 points late in the third quarter of the game, only to blow it to the former.

Advanced metrics, which have failed the world throughout the past year once again laid their dirty mathematical curses on the Falcons. But the ads, as usual were sublime! In such an important moment in global history, how would our favorite brands react? Look no further:

1) Squarespace John Malkovich

Squarespace took a risk here, putting John Malkovich at the helm of an ad seen by millions of people too young to know who he is. The next generation of domain desirers might need a more relevant hero, but this commentary on the infinite loop of identity assumption, frustration and Internet impersonation was hypnotic and charming regardless of context (like having seen “Being John Malkovich).

In the commercial, Malkovich is apparently prepping a clothing line, and has decided to finally get a website to sell it on. Too bad JohnMalkovich.com is taken. When his assistant tells him it’s been snatched, Malkovich says:

“There’s a film about me being me.”

“Isn’t it a movie about other people being inside you?” she asks.

“Sure, why not,” he says.

Everything is interpretable, except domain ownership is definite. Squarespace can help.

What is identity? How can we be sure of it? Rather than dwelling on these existential issues, Malkovich starts cursing at the Internet, which was softened during the Super Bowl. We’ve all been there before, brutally slammed against the reality of our own technological inferiority, or inability to get our way in the face of a crushing technocracy. It’s equal parts relatable, charming, hilarious and for some, a nostalgic callback to a much more tender time in our nation’s history, when post-modern, meta pop art like “Being John Malkovich” could capture our collective imagination.

2) World of Tanks

World of Tanks, a free-to-play game for PC, Playstation and XBOX, unleashed two extremely short commercials during the Super Bowl. WoT is an extension of a gaming model developed for mobile that is being applied to console gaming, and eventually will likely be introduced into all facets of human life and entertainment. In this model, called freemium, the game lures in what it hopes will be a massive audience with the promise that the game is free, and in this case, a multiplayer online experience that will compensate for limited real world social interaction. Once they have the players hooked, they can pay for premium features, like new tanks, special weapons, tank decorations, perhaps even limited edition depleted uranium to celebrate the worst tank crimes against humanity in our nation’s recent history.

Both of WoT’s shorts lampoon reality television, which is craven and corny in comparison to the pleasure of destroying enemies with digital tanks. In “Real Awful Moms,” the rich housewife television trend is skewered. First the awful moms start a fight of their own in a momentary scene ripped from the networks, seconds before a tank crashes through a wall to the screams of the hated housewives. The next short takes on the home makeover reality sphere. Less people can afford to own homes, or apartments, and the value of property will no longer rise forever. Soon many of us will be living in shipping containers, repurposed bathtubs, plastic playhouses, and the like. In “Teensy House Buyers,” a couple looks to purchase an adorable small home, before a tank crushes it. In both cases we’re reminded, “In a world of tanks, tanks rule!” The commercials benefit from a morsel of something vaguely familiar and annoying, before the displeasure of it is destroyed under the tracks of an awesome tank, and the invitation to play with them, nominally for free.

3) Avocados From Mexico

Rather than directly address the brazen public effort by the American government to attack Mexican people, this commercial hints at how Americans might be hit, in the form of a tasty, trendy fruit! In the ad, a cabal reminiscent of “Eyes Wide Shut” gathers to discuss the need to be more vigilant in keeping conspiracies from the public, only to be distracted by a gluttonous guacamole frenzy. The real culprits of deflated footballs, alien secrets, faked moon landings are revealed to be bumbling dummies that can’t help but livestream their greatest secrets. The ad taps into why Americans love conspiracies: they distract from actually confronting the open banality of suffering. Plus, while real problems are layered, conspiracies offer repeatable, digestible anecdotes that seemingly explain why things are so awful.

Anti-immigrant hatred is racing across the West, manifesting in policy that presupposes we’re better off separate from each other, because jobs and resources are devoured in a zero-sum global ecosystem. But what of the resources we get in large part from importation? This commercial doesn’t have to say it, but it’s clear: the Illuminati will be wolfing down avocados long after the normies have run out. The greatest trick the globalists ever pulled was convincing the world they were nationalists. Instead of questioning why the people don’t own the means of avocados, we’re left to battle against each other and our own interests to get our hands on what remains of them. Sad!

4) Stranger Things 2

2016’s most popular Netflix creation is coming back with a fervency demanded by advanced consumer viewing metrics. What it lacked in substance, the first season made up for in obsessive mood collection from youth adventures like “E.T.” and “Stand By Me.” These stories are so popular because they let the viewer picture battle with government bureaucracies, supernatural phenomenon, bloodthirsty greasers or whomever as a means to self-realizing, escapism. Stranger Things also rests on a deep wish/fear of the American consumer: our inner thoughts, no matter how dangerous, will be manifested in reality.

In this season, we’ll be treated to classic 80’s TV advertisements, including an Eggo commercial starring Fred Savage’s big brother from “The Wonder Years.” Outside, a dark storm is brewing, which will require the kids to dress up as Ghostbusters, bike in frantic formation, and perhaps confront a giant, multi-appendaged monster. Or perhaps it’s just misunderstood? The trailer doesn’t give too much away, but demonstrates how easily the show can immerse its audience in the aesthetics of Stranger Things’ source material. The commercial for Stranger Things 2 promises the recreation of a pre-Internet world where indoor fantasy is immediately converted into external odyssey, even as millions of Americans sat inside watching a game in tandem.

5) Nintendo Switch

First things first, when you wake up in the morning, you grab your phone. But what if instead you grabbed your Nintendo console, that seamlessly integrates between mobile and more traditional gaming? The Switch suggests that users will always be able to game individually, wherever they may travel, and at any moment can share those experiences with any other user, through mobile integration, tablet or television. Even the controllers are designed to break into smaller, handheld tools with new uses.

Nintendo, more than any of its competitors, has positioned itself as a lifestyle brand as much as a company that makes entertainment systems. This where grandfathers build relationships with their grandsons, games that prize utility and interactivity over graphics quality. The Switch isn’t for gamers, it’s for humans.

Most telling in the commercial are all the social settings its users engage with, rather that are facilitated by Nintendo itself. From impromptu gaming at the office or school auditorium, to enjoying a digital duel in a sun drenched park, you can have it all. The one through line throughout the commercial shows a Zelda player that renters the fantasy world from bed, switches to a little bit of TV screen time, only to take on a cumbersome, obtrusive journey into the real world, to a laundromat. Despite that drudgery, what does he find? An opportunity to interact with a person, via Nintendo Switch.

6) Hyundai

Noted military/law enforcement propagandist, Mark Wahlberg enabler and disaster fetishist Peter Berg (“Deepwater Horizon,” “Lone Survivor,” “Patriots Day) was tapped by Hyundai to break the glass ceiling of Super Bowl commercial creation. Berg could cement himself in the annals of American heroics, if he could create a commercial filmed, edited and distributed during the night of the Super Bowl itself. Why would Hyundai constrain an auteur like Berg? To show the troops watching the Super Bowl, and because it would take the sacrifice and precision of a true operator.

The commercial begins with an aerial shot of an American military base in Poland. We’re reminded that as Americans, we wouldn’t be able to enjoy the Super Bowl if it weren’t for troops in Poland protecting our way of life from…the resurgent Russians perhaps? The rising specter of anti-imperialism which questions our global military presence? That’s not important. What matters are the sacrifices of our troops, who have been removed from their families, and our divine way of life, which their service makes possible.

The troops in Poland are allowed to watch the Super Bowl (what better way to keep them connected to what they fight for), but Hyundai removes three of them from its screening. Why? To place them in pods where 360-degree cameras and screens allow them to experience the Super Bowl while videochatting with their families. In the big scheme of things, Hyundai cars don’t matter. It’s what they can give back to those who have given the most that captures the hearts of consumers worldwide.

7) Budweiser

As xenophobic rumblings become governmental policy, corporations must do some soul-searching. What’s the best way to capitalize off these trends? Do they bow down to reactionary nationalism? Or would it be more profitable to present themselves as members of the neoliberal resistance? After all, as huge sectors of employment become increasingly scarce, open borders mean ever-plummeting labor costs. Plus, it’s easy to position capitalist strategizing as if it’s motivated by human rights impulses. Sometimes, the two can be seamlessly merged, like when we’re reminded that some of the greatest commercial accomplishments were achieved by immigrants. After all, Steve Jobs was an immigrant! And he went on to build an empire which exploits Asian workers to amass more capital than over 100 nations’ governments. Business knows no boundaries.

In this commercial, a cautious doctor asks a plucky young immigrant, “why leave Germany?” He doesn’t say he wants a better life for him or his family. “I want to brew beer,” he says, with fire in his wallet. When he arrives, he’s met with angry faces telling him he’s unwanted, but still he persists. Through rain, fire and mud, he keeps his trusty notebook close, with its business plans intact. Then, in St. Louis, he meets a man named Anheuser, and reveals himself to be Busch. The rest is ubiquitous beer mediocrity.

The ad doesn’t put much muscle into evoking a deep, emotional reaction, choosing instead to play to the American bootstrap mythos, and gently plant Budweiser’s flag on the side of multiculturalism. No one knows just how things will turn out, but for Budweiser it seems safe enough immigrants start companies, so perhaps they deserve to be considered human.

8) Skittles

Love is grand, but Skittles are forever. In one of its Super Bowl ads, Skittles forgoes trickery, politics, emotional intrigue or innovation to offer a classic human motivation piece of advertising and direct descendent of the “it’s our product, it’s delicious” jingled past. We all want Skittles, no matter what natural conflicts exist between us. If some foolish boy (or “Candy Casanova” as Skittles’ ad copy calls him) is just going to throw unlimited Skittles into the mouths of his love, her father, her mother, her grandmother, a robber, police officer and an animatronic beaver, who will stop him? So long as he believes the next flavor orb might wake up Katie, he’ll keep pitching. Behind the silent Skittles receptacles, we see a bed littered with unclaimed candy morsels. Skittles’ is whimsically telling us it just tastes better when you catch it in your mouth.

In another Skittles’ Super Bowl ad, we’re given a slight nod to cultural exploration, without any of the pesky political relevance of other ads. Here, beloved former NFL running back Marshawn Lynch (who retired rather than sacrifice his body and mind any further than he already had) travels to Houston. Houston, Scotland that is! The Super Bowl was played in Houston, Texas, but Lynch is beginning his candy diplomat career. Don’t tell him he’s riding a Skittles bike, why that’s just a Skittles bag connected to his bike! Lynch has come to spread the gift of Skittles, American football and pure joy. Not included: Lynch playing chicken with a Scottish bus while on this adventure:

9) NFL

The NFL is perhaps the most conservative sport in America. They are leading the country in domestic abuse, disregard for the lives of their players, dismissal of basic human/civil rights, and imperial cheerleading. A few years ago, it got the highest ratings of any American sport. Now, the NFL is dealing with a weakened product and an exodus of viewers. Why? Pressure to make the game less violent has turned some fans off, there aren’t enough truly great teams, the game is more pass-heavy that ever but doesn’t have enough superb quarterbacks, and much more.

When it seemed football’s popularity could only go up, the NFL bureaucracy could afford to sneer at critics, players and reform. Even during this season, a narrative by league surrogates held that players protesting the National Anthem were selfish, hypocritical idiots that should know their place. In its Super Bowl ad, the NFL says we’re better off putting our differences aside and working together. It feels good, but ignores the ads targets and their creators have different goals. For example, Pat Tillman, an Arizona Cardinal’s linebacker who became an Army Ranger after 9/11, makes a cameo. Tillman was killed in Afghanistan by friendly fire, but his death was originally used by the Bush administration, who lied about the circumstances of his death then used his memory to drum up support for the endless war on terrorism. Later, Tillman’s brother, penned an anti-war essay in remembrance of his brother. It also came out that Tillman thought the Iraqi War was an “imperial folly.” Nevertheless, he appears in the NFL’s commercial memorializing the common ground we share. As Tillman appears we hear, “inside these lines, we can bring out the best in each other.”

10) Kia Niro

Kia employed comedian Melissa McCarthy to exploit the apathetic consumer’s distaste for activism. While most activists confine themselves to social media posting, McCarthy is out there in the world. Also, Kia was smart enough to confine its criticisms to the environmental warriors, as opposed to the stickier world of social justice. The impulse is the same: let the viewer, who is doing absolutely nothing feel good about that in comparison to how ridiculous McCarthy looks getting involved. Plus, Kia has a solution: buy a car that you’ve been told helps the environment. This way, you can avoid being tortured within an inch of your life by whales, ice caps, trees, rhinos, or whatever cause you might be consider getting involved in. Effort is messy and dangerous, Kia’s are safe, clean, and let you do your part.

“It’s hard to be an eco warrior, but it’s easy to drive like one.” This tagline could be applied to anything Americans might consider doing outside of their personal containers, whether they be digital, physical or transportive.

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The State of Marketing Education 2017 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/state-marketing-education-2017-global-expansion-opportunity-rise-contentious-marketing/ Mon, 30 Jan 2017 00:36:09 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=800 History of Marketing Education 1. Founding the Field (1900-1920) In the course of their first 20 years, marketing classes sought to teach students that their budding field was an economic […]

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History of Marketing Education

1. Founding the Field (1900-1920)

In the course of their first 20 years, marketing classes sought to teach students that their budding field was an economic institution and a practice in distribution. Which means at its base, the field of marketing was founded on the principle of economic efficiency; or in more simple terms, on finding an answer to the following question: how can we reach the greatest number of people while spending the least amount of money?


2. Formalizing the Field (1920-1950)

These halcyon days were marked by key advances for the marketing field as an academic institution. Such advances included the founding of scholarly journals dedicated to furthering the fields of retail and marketing, like Journal of Retailing (1925) and Journal of Marketing (1936). But due to the economic and social rollercoaster ride that surrounded the breakneck prosperity of The Roaring 20s and immediate hardship of The Great Depression, this era was also marked by extreme social and economic whiplash, a global financial upheaval which led to dramatic expansion and contraction of supply and demand for educated marketers.

Contemporary industries witnessed similar sharp downturns in demand for marketers during the Great Recession.

Yet similar to what happened for companies that reinvested in advertising and the postwar consumer economy that surrounded the Depression, contemporary companies that reinvested advertising budgets in new marketing models like social media, programmatic advertising, and research and development were generally able to emerge from the Recession successfully. Think: AirBnB, Uber, and Alibaba. Earlier brand revolutionaries like Procter & Gamble, Chevrolet, and Camel cigarettes were likewise inspired in the face of Depression-era adversity to continue advertising and innovating, a move that proved a boon to business after WWII, especially as those booming years ushered us into the third era of modern marketing education: “A Paradigm Shift.”

   

3. A Paradigm Shift (1950-1980)

High times would issue forth an era of global economic prosperity, a time when the fundamental educational models for teaching marketing changed almost beyond recognition. During this period of high supply and high demand, two distinct schools of thought emerged within the marketing discipline: one that viewed marketing as a science, the other that viewed marketing as management. These two schools of thought blended theoretical and and practical approaches to marketing education, and together they achieved innovation across disciplines—not only within the academy, but also across industries.

But the training process for earning an education in marketing became more challenging.

And as tends to happen during periods of accelerated progress across an industry, the knowledge base required to attain an education becomes more expansive. And as that knowledge base expanded for marketers learning the trade, so did the depth and breadth of available information about the field. With the advent of the Internet, rapid expansion of available information has led us into our most recent era, one for which the changes of the previous era have intensified to such a degree that “a paradigm shift” might be said to occur every year.


4. The Shift Intensifies (1980-present)

Our current era is marked by market and information saturation. Most of us already know this from our experience as users and consumers rather than marketers: there are opportunities for brand messaging to reach us at almost every waking moment of our lives, from the time we slide off our smartphone alarm clocks in the morning, to the hours we spend online at work, to the time we arrive home and see an unknown number flashing across our phones. All this opportunity for messaging means that the knowledge infrastructure necessary to teach marketers how to reach their audiences has expanded rapidly to accommodate the spread of new ideas and new information through thousands of new media channels. Translation: the marketing universe is expanding, and it’s getting tough for education to keep up. As an industry, marketing has reached a point where it is practically necessary to attain some level of higher education.

That degree of higher education—whether it be a single course, a certification, or a literal advanced degree—has not only become essential to landing a job. It has become essential to building a unique set of skills that can differentiate our message, help it cut through the noise, and most importantly, make an impact on the widening multimedia landscape we inhabit today.


Marketing Today

Informal Learning Opportunities Abound As Digital Media Consumption and Digital Ad Spending Likely to Grow

Today, “higher” education doesn’t have to mean a piece of paper you hang on your wall. That’s why it’s important to ask the question “Do I need a marketing degree?” If you do, then there are options galore, all the way from bachelors degrees, to masters degrees, to MBAs with concentrations in marketing.

But a lot of marketing programs, even those with a digital focus, don’t offer the opportunities necessary to learn the basics of one or more of the following digital marketing skillsets: analytics, mobile, content, SEO, and social media management.

There are several good reasons that these topics fall through the cracks. Many of these skillsets require hands-on experience rather than cold, calculated study, something that can be difficult for universities to offer from a top-down perspective. It’s also difficult for marketing departments, which many times work in conjunction with communications departments, to fit every facet of their widening fields into a 2- or even 4-year curriculum. And finally, informal education options (e.g., MOOCs, bootcamps, and corporate or small business training programs) have emerged over the last five years to fill the cracks left by formal marketing education programs. Alternative options like these have made a real impact on the online learning landscape, especially for fields like marketing and media, whose focus is largely shifting to predominantly online delivery methods: the same digital methods with which their courses are delivered.

Because of this shift toward digital, informal learning opportunities for online marketing have abounded, supplementing formal degree programs in an effort to meet consumers’ increased demand for digital consumption.

Ad spending has generally followed this demand for increased digital consumption.

Pew Research Center found in 2016 that digital advertising continues to grow and account for a larger proportion of all ad spending.

Source: eMarketer U.S. Ad Spending Estimates. “State of the News Media 2016”

Following this trend of sustained linear growth for digital ad spending over a six-year period, the amount spent on digital advertising in 2015 accounted for approximately one-third (32.6%) of total ad spending in the United States. That’s up from 28% of annual spending for fiscal year 2014, which was up from 25% in 2013, which was up from 22% in 2012, which was up from 20% in 2011, and is approaching an average spending increase of +$7 billion per year on digital advertising alone.

While digital ad spending numbers aren’t out yet for 2016, sustained linear growth suggests that we should expect both digital media consumption and ad spending to rise for 2017.

Considered along with the growth and variety of informal learning opportunities that educate the marketers who impact these numbers on a day-to-day basis, it’s no surprise that the online marketing education industry is expanding.


Online Marketing Education Industry Expands as Credentials, Certificates, MBAs, MAs, MSs, and Bachelor Degree Programs Grow

Noting a relative spike in the number of MBA programs around the globe, William Wilkie, the Nathe Professor of Marketing at Notre Dame, presented at the Academy of Marketing Science that there had been a “huge jump” in MBA programs worldwide over a period of 15 years. According to Wilkie’s presentation, this jump included a doubling of MBA degree programs in the U.S., an increase of 50 such degree programs in Russia, as well as 60 in China, and greater than 100 in central and eastern Europe.

Over one-third of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB)’s 521 accredited business schools report fully online business degrees for the year 2016.

Data for the total number of online business degree programs accredited by the international Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) support Wilkie’s observation of general growth. Over the five-year period between 2011 and 2016, the total number of online marketing programs in the United States grew 47 percent, from 130 online degree programs in 2011-2012, to 192 online degree programs in 2015-2016. Similarly, the number of online Undergraduate, Masters-Specialist, and Masters-Generalist (MBA) programs grew measurably, by 80 percent, 67 percent, and 44 percent, respectively. Accredited Undergraduate programs grew the most, having increased by 37 programs (nearly double) and at a rate of greater than 7 new accredited programs per year between 2011 and 2016.

Per the MOOC database Class Central, the number of informal online learning opportunities has also expanded substantially over the past two years, from 49 courses in the cross-listed subjects of “Marketing & Finance” in July 2014, to 52 courses in the subject of “Marketing” alone in July 2015, to 93 courses in the subject of “Marketing” alone in November 2016, to 137 courses in the subject of “Marketing” alone that are available today. While these numbers fluctuate regularly as Class Central updates its database daily to account for new open courses and old courses that have closed, these numbers give some representative snapshots that illustrate how quickly informal online marketing education opportunities have expanded in recent years, from getting lumped in with another subject (i.e., Finance) to coming into their own as a subject with courses, credentials, and certifications offered by institutions as diverse as George Mason University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business.

For 2017, expect more of the same expansion for both formal and informal education opportunities, except with a greater sense of competition industry-wide.


As Old School Marketers Learn New School Marketing Skills, Expect Contentious Marketing to Become More Popular

To return to the end of the beginning, we now inhabit a marketing landscape where it has become difficult to avoid the noise of brand messaging. The volume of this noise reached a peak in 2016, at the end of which much of the world emerged from one of the most contentious years in political (and marketing) history. Controversies surrounding the presidential election in the United States and the “Brexit” referendum in the United Kingdom have promised marked effects on industries large and small. But the effect these events have had on marketing education is materializing more quickly, and an explanation of that effect begins with an answer to the following question about contemporary leadership: what happens when contentious leaders learn how to spread their message online?

The short answer is contentious marketing.

The most simple example of contentious marketing in action is Donald Trump. Although a successful businessman, Donald Trump did not become what we might call a “well-rounded,” modern, or even content marketer until he became a presidential candidate. Prior to his candidacy, Trump’s marketing strategy consisted essentially of a large-scale brand awareness campaign, during which he worked to expand his business empire by purchasing several large pieces of real estate on which to situate his name. What this amounted to was a very expensive, old school, billboard and TV advertising campaign. While using The Apprentice and his luxury brand to promote his name, he made little use of the news media in the way he did during his campaign. And aside from some political grandstanding via Twitter in 2009 when he created his account, he didn’t make much use of social media either.

But in 2015, he began using Twitter and TV news to take what little political grandstanding he did perform to several new levels. Selecting media that he could dominate, our newly minted modern marketer was able to reach unprecendentedly various and sundry audiences for his name and brand, as well as reach unparalelled levels of engagement from every level of global society, supporters and dissenters alike. Such an audience and its engagment levels allowed Trump to achieve more TV airtime and more Twitter attention than any of his competitors (or any other story in 2016). His name and brand dominated the conversation so thoroughly, that even bad news could become good news, or to turn an old phrase, any press could become good press.

Barring a discussion of what the success of these tactics might imply about current global political climates (and all advice that would end with “start trolling politicians via Twitter”), these winning tactics teach us a good many things about the current winds of online marketing. They teach us that saying something contentious gets attention, and that making a bold statement—whether it be a reference to current affairs, pop culture, or fellow competitors—while also taking a big risk, can result in a huge reward, even if a brand name is attached to the perceived winner.

Now, we’ve known since 2013 that much of the web’s most popular content (i.e., viral content) is also the web’s most controversial content. Think: the blue dress vs. gold dress controversy. But according to this study, put out by the Wharton School of Business, controversy only tends to increase likelihood of discussion “at low levels,” while it tends to have the opposite effect at moderate-to-high levels. Translation: that advice about never bringing up politics or religion at the dinner table also applies to content marketing.

Where it might not apply is in the realm of contentious marketing, or what appears to be an emergent form of marketing that hinges on the publication of content that is attached to a strong opinion. Indeed, a more recent study published near the end of 2016 found that strong opinion pieces are earning some of the largest numbers of links and shares among all forms of published content, a finding that applied to political posts and strong opinion pieces in B2B industries equally.

These changes likely signal our most recent paradigm shift—a change in tide that has arrived amid an expanding wake of new opportunities for earning a marketing education either online and worldwide—and a new direction for the state of marketing education to take in 2017.

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The 25 Best Cities for Marketing Jobs in 2017 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/best-cities-for-marketing-jobs/ Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:09:57 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=718 Like all professions, the marketing world is in the middle of an upheaval, in large part because of the effects of digital, which has forced marketers to rethink traditional practices […]

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Methodology:
  • Marketing Job Openings (1/2): the total number of full-time marketing job openings within 25 miles.
  • Job Earnings (1/2): the number of marketing positions garnering salaries in the top 2 of 5 bins. Adjusted for cost of living and differences in compensation levels by city.

Data Source: Indeed.com


1.
Oakland, California
oakland-96413_1280 With a population of about 420,000, Oakland ranks first on our list, offering more than 9,400 full-time marketing jobs at some of the most competitive salaries in the country: over 2,000 employees earn over $110,000 per year, and the average marketing manager salary is $105,249. Still, positions are spread evenly across the spectrum, and several thousand entry-level and mid-tier opportunities are available, as well. Major corporations are in the area – including Kaiser Permanente, Clorox, Dreyer’s, and Cost Plus World Markets – and recently more tech companies are moving into Oakland from the other side of the bay. (Ask.com and Pandora are already there, and Uber moves into new offices in 2017.) San Francisco’s rapid expansion has benefited the city, as well. A younger, upstart class of entrepreneurs, creatives, academics, and activists have helped to create a vibrant and modern community, which struggled to establish itself for much of the mid-to-late 20th century. Recently, Wealth Management ranked the area 5th for for tech entrepreneurs by total venture capital investment; it’s been ranked 2nd among best cities to start a career, and 4th in total professional opportunities. Oakland is also the fifth-busiest port in the United States, handling 99% of all containerized goods in Northern California. Beyond its economic outlook, Oakland has one of the highest concentrations of artists and in the country and a diverse foodie scene, with French, Italian, Spanish, Asian, Latino, Caribbean, and other cuisines that complement the city’s eclectic vibe. Other attractions include museums, parks, theaters, and more. UC Berkeley is just around the corner.    
2
San Francisco, California
san-francisco-1772566_1280 San Francisco ties for second. With a population just over 860,000, the city offers the seventh-most marketing jobs on our list, more than half of which make over $60,000 a year. In general, San Fransisco marketing workers are among the highest paid in the country: 20% make six-figures; 65% are among the top two-fifths of earners; and marketing managers earn a $110,000 salary on average. Still, there’s room for entry-level and mid-tier positions, too. Of course, some of the largest, most visible companies in the world call San Fransisco headquarters: Salesforce, Dropbox, Airbnb, Wells Fargo, McKesson, Twitter, Del Monte Foods, Charles Schwab, and more, across a wide range of industries. Also of note to marketing professionals, ad agencies like Goodby, Silverstein & Partners; Landor Associates, and AKQA. When we expand to include the surrounding Bay Area, obviously opportunities skyrocket. That said, contrary to popular opinion, there’s more to San Fran than tech alone. The largest employer in the city is government, and tourism remains a major business, making up 14% of the city’s workforce. (For perspective, more than 18 million visited in 2014, bringing in $10.67 billion.) Throughout its history, San Fransisco has been famous for its stunning natural beauty, distinct architecture, and vibrant culture, with lively music, food, and arts scenes. And despite the city’s notorious cost of living, it remains ranked among the best in America for quality of living.
2
New York, New York
new-york-668616_1280 New York ties San Fransisco as number two on the list. For a city of more than 8.5 million, there are, appropriately, a large number marketing jobs available — more than 17,000 full-time. Plenty of jobs are available on an entry – to mid-level pay grade, but 69% are in the top two-fifths of earners, with the average marketing manager making $108,802 per year. It goes without saying, but career options are across the board. Major corporations are headquartered in the city – in finance, technology, media, healthcare, telecommunications, and more — and Madison Avenue is famous for its premier advertising agencies (though many of these have since moved throughout New York); companies include Interpublic Group, Omnicom Group, Blue Fountain Media, R/GA, AKQA, Droga5, 360i, DDB Worldwide, Deutsch, Horizon Media, Huge, McCann Erickson, Ogilvy & Mather, and Young & Rubicam. With a $1.33 trillion gross metropolitan product in 2012 — the largest in the country, plus 12 countries combined — New York’s business chops are unquestioned. Of course, neither are its well-documented expenses: the cost of living index stands at 164.7. Still, what you’ll forfeit in rent, food, and the rest, you’ll make up for in unparalleled opportunities, professional and otherwise (which may appeal to entry and mid-level workers). Build up a bullet-proof portfolio, all while within a subway ride of world class restaurants from every cuisine imaginable; art, history, and culture museums; theaters big and small; and some of the most famous parks in the country.
4
Fremont, California
fremont At a population of around 230,000, Freemont has nearly 7,500 marketing jobs available within a 25-mile radius of the city, and is the third Northern Californian city to make the cut thus far. 63% of positions offer salaries in the top two-fifths tier, and over 3,000 are considered mid-level. Managing positions average $108,821 per year, one of the highest levels in the United States. Most important, many openings are available at world-class companies: Facebook, Apple, Google, Super Micro Computer, Oracle, Genentech, Insight Wealth Strategies, Stanford University, Intel, Abbott, Marketo, and more. While Fremont’s proximity to the Bay Area has increased the cost of living (indexed at 145, with a median rent of about $1,700), its location has also attracted more businesses into the city and expanded the economy. The Tesla Factory employs approximately 6,000 people, making it the largest job provider, in front of Kaiser Permanente, Western Digital, Lam Research Corporation, Boston Scientific, and the city government and education system. Beyond its economy, Freemont offers top-notch culture and recreation opportunities, including a 450-acre central park, wildlife refuge, Mission Peak Regional Preserve, and more. Ohlone College, The University of Phoenix Bay Area Campus, and Northwestern Polytechnic University all lie within the city limits.
5
Newark, New Jersey
newark-2 Newark has over 17,500 full-time marketing jobs, making it second overall on our list for total jobs available. Many of these are also well-paying: about 1,600 offer between $60k and $75k per year; 1,300 are in the $75k to $90k bracket. More than 1,700 positions pay six-figure salaries, and the average pay for marketing managers is $105,330. With a population of just over 280,000, Newark is one of the country’s major hubs for transportation and logistics, in large part because of its proximity to New York City and as a central connector through the Northeast Corridor. Additional industries include finance, healthcare, government, and the third-largest insurance center in the US; Prudential Financial, Mutual Benefit Life, Fireman’s Insurance, and American Insurance Company were all founded in Newark. PSEG, Panasonic Corporation of North America, Audible.com, and Manischewitz are all headquartered in town, as well. Newark also offers the benefit of more affordable living in the area; and while the cost of living is still above national averages at 119, it’s a bargain compared to much of the other major cities along I-95. Several higher education options are available: Essex County College, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Rutgers University, a Berkeley College campus, and Seton Hall’s School of Law. The New Jersey Performing Arts Center features the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and the New Jersey State Opera, in addition a variety of other entertainment programs, drawing nearly a half a million visitors each year. Other attractions include the Institute of Jazz Studies, Newark Museum, the New Jersey Historical Society, and a number of festivals.
6
Glendale, Arizona
glendale At a population of over 240,000, Glendale has nearly 8,500 full-time marketing jobs. Many of these are top-quality: 68% offer salaries in the top two-fifths, and 1,800 pay over $90,000. The average pay for a manager is $93,290. Meanwhile, there are thousands of entry- and mid-level positions available, as well. Companies hiring include H&R Block, SONIC, Dunkin’ Donuts, Beauty Brands, and Sun Marketing Solutions, among others. Statewide, the largest employers are in trade and transportation, government, business services, healthcare, and education. The top private job providers are Banner Health, WalMart, Kroger, and Wells Fargo & Co. Perhaps its biggest selling point: Glendale is by far the most affordable city at the highest ranking. The city’s cost of living index is below the national average at 92.7. The median gross rent is $842, and the mean housing price is $167,208. Again, the lowest so far by a large margin. Known as Arizona’s Antique Capital, the city prides itself on its history and holds a folk & heritage festival, music festival, and major sporting events at the University of Phoenix Stadium, which the Arizona Cardinals call home. (It has also hosted Super Bowls, National Championships, college bowl games, and concerts.) Midwestern University and Glendale Community College are in the city limits, as is U of Arizona’s highly regarded Thunderbird School of Global Management.
6
Jersey City, New Jersey
jersey-city-1378540_1280 At a population of about 260,000, Jersey City ties for sixth on our list, with over 17,500 marketing jobs available within a 25 mile radius. Many of these are top-dollar salaries: nearly 4,000 positions offer more than $90k per year, and 63% pay in the top two-fifths. That said, there are more than enough entry- to mid-level positions available that offer unique professional experience and a high-quality client roll call. Companies offering positions include H&R Block, NBCUniversal, IPG Mediabrands, Citi, Dunkin’ Donuts, Deloitte, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley, and Selby Jennings, among others. Other headquarters include Verisk Analytics, Lord Abbett, Goya Foods, and Forbes. Of course, Jersey City greatly benefits from the neighboring metropolis on the other side of the Hudson — New York is just a ferry-ride away – but Jersey City residents receive a big discount on cost of living. Median gross rent stands at $1,166, and the mean housing is $334,595. There’s also plenty to do. The city is full of registered historic places and museums and cultural centers, including the Jersey City Museum, Mana Contemporary, the Museum of Russian Art, the Liberty Science Center, the Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal, and more. The city’s Shakespeare festival is sponsored by the Hudson Shakespeare Company, which puts on a free outdoor play once a month in the summer.
8
San Jose, California
san-jose-makeup-school San Jose offers about 5,500 marketing jobs for a city of about 1 million, the third largest in the state and the largest in the Bay Area. Though this is a relatively small set, the 17th largest on the list, most of these are high-quality, top-paying jobs. 64% of jobs are in the top two-fifths salary tier, and over a thousand offer salaries above $90k per year (many are six-figures). Further, marketing managers’ average pay is $110,430, which is the highest on the list. Plenty of mid-level and entry-level marketing positions are also available. Given San Jose’s Bay Area location, it’s no surprise that these jobs are highly sought after: Facebook, Apple, Google, Super Micro Computer, Cisco, Oracle, Intel, Intuit, Yahoo!, NVIDIA, Stanford University, and elsewhere. Of course, San Jose will cost you a pretty penny. The cost of living index stands at 149.5; in 2013, median rent was $1,508, and mean prices for all housing units was $617,104. As the acknowledged “Capital of Silicon Valley,” tech companies are everywhere, but San Jose remains a diverse economy. Other top employers include Kaiser Permanente, Target Corporation, Brocade Communications, the U.S. Postal Service, and the County of Santa Clara. The city also boasts an extensive parks system. Nearly 16,000 acres of parks are within the city limits, the oldest of which dates back to 1872, and the city ranks in the top 15 nationally for parks according to The Trust for Public Land. Other attractions include museums, theaters, professional sports, and historic architecture.
9
Boston, Massachusetts
boston-1775870_1280 With a population of 670,000, Boston has over 7,500 marketing jobs available within 25 miles of the city. And make no mistake, these pay very well. 67% of jobs are in the top two-fifths earnings bracket, and nearly 1,400 offer more than $95k per year. Marketing managers on average make $105,968. Still, the bulk of positions are entry- and mid-level positions (over 6,000) that combine excellent experience with resume-building portfolio opportunities. Among the companies hiring include Dunkin Donuts, Staples, Advantage Solutions, HAMRA Management Company, Oracle, Wayfair, Michael Page US, Shire, Domino’s, and Harvard University. Boston proper holds the highest concentration of jobs, but Cambridge, Waltham, Framingham, and Burlington are other hubs. Boston isn’t cheap, but like New York you’re getting a wealth of cultural and professional benefits in return. (The cost of living index is 144, and median rent in 2013 was $1,263.) Boston ranks in the top 30 most economically powerful cities in the world and has the United States’ sixth-largest economy. Financial services, insurance, tourism, healthcare, biotechnology, and publishing are among the major business sectors that make up the city’s diverse economy. Education, of course, is another major driver: Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston University, and Brandeis University are each within the city limits, in addition to a dozen other private colleges, community colleges, and top-rated music conservatories like the Boston Conservatory and Berklee College of Music.
10
Seattle, Washington
space-needle-1509141_1280 Seattle has nearly 5,500 marketing jobs for a population of 680,000. Pay is excellent; 60% of positions are salaried in the top two-fifths, and marketing managers can expect to make $101,757 on average. Over 4,000 are mid- and entry-level positions. Another major business and technology hub to make the list, the companies offering positions are high-quality: Amazon, Microsoft, T-Mobile, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Expedia, Advantage Solutions, University of Washington Medical Center, and more. While Seattle proper has the highest concentration of opportunities, Bellevue, Redmond, Kent, Kirkland, Bothell, Lynnwood, and more have jobs within a 25 mile radius of the city. Seattle is among the more affordable major economic outposts. The cost of living index is 120, lower than all of its competitors in Northern California, and median gross rent was $1,172 in 2013. As the eleventh-largest economy in the country, Seattle is highly diversified and modernized. In addition to the major corporations listed above, the city has a major port system, start-up community, and healthcare sector, with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, PATH, Infectious Disease Research Institute, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation headquartered in town. It has been ranked as the #1 “Smarter City” according to the NRDC, based on its government policies and green economy, and is committed to becoming North America’s first “climate neutral” city by 2030.
11
Washington, D.C.
roofs-1512508_1280 Washington DC ties for eleventh spot, with nearly 7,900 marketing positions available to a population of 670,000. DC is especially suited for entry- and mid-level marketing professionals, with a wealth of jobs in that demographic, but high-paying senior level positions can be found. The average marketing manager salary is just above $100,000, and the general salary benchmarks are relatively high across the board. (62% are in the top two-fifths.) As you might expect, some major companies hire in the area: Deloitte, Booz Allen Hamilton, Sapient Government Services, Capital One, Marriott International, Harris Teeter, and more. Arlington, Alexandria, McLean, and Fairfax all also offer marketing opportunities. The cost of living index is 125, and median rent in 2013 was $1,307. DC isn’t cheap, but few major cities in the Northeast Corridor are. With a gross product of $425 billion in 2010, DC is the country’s fourth-largest economy, and the city boasts a nationally low unemployment rate. Despite the large number of government employees, which make up 29% of the workforce, DC has a highly diversified, robust economy featuring financial services, insurance companies, law firms, lobbying firms, media, tech, healthcare, and public relations, among other business sectors. The city is also home to some of the most prestigious colleges and universities in the country – Georgetown University, George Washington University, Howard University, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies – and several important medical research facilities, such as Washington Hospital Center, the Children’s National Medical Center, and the National Institutes of Health.
11
Chicago, Illinois
chicago-690364_1280-1 Tied with DC is Chicago, which has nearly 9,000 marketing positions for a city of 2.7 million. 60% of jobs fall in the top two-fifths of marketing salaries, and the average salary for a marketing manager is just under $100k. Entry- and mid-level professionals also typically have higher-than-usual pay, and top companies hire in the area: Epsilon, Deloitte, JPMorgan Chase, The Creative Group, Citi, and more. Major agencies in the city include Ogilvy, BBDO, Cramer-Krasselt, 3Q Digital, Rosetta, and Resolution Media. While Chicago offers the highest concentration of jobs, Northbrook, Downers Grove, Oak Brook, and Deerfield are other options. Chicago is perhaps the most affordable cultural and economic hub in the US. The cost of living index is 107, and the median rent in 2013 was $943. Mean pricing across all housing units was $276,694. Chicago is the third-largest economy in the US, producing $630.3 billion. It has also been recognized as one of the country’s most diverse economies, and was named the the fourth-most important business center in the world, according to the MasterCard Worldwide Centers of Commerce Index. There are 17 Fortune 500 companies in the city, plus 17 Financial Times 500 companies; Boeing, Kraft Foods, McDonald’s, Sears Holdings, Walgreens, Ace Hardware, Claire’s, ULTA Beauty and Crate & Barrel are all headquartered here. On top of that are world-class entertainment and cultural attractions, from museums and parks, to a vibrant nightlife of comedy, jazz, and cuisines.
13
Los Angeles, California
los-angeles-1840764_1280 Los Angeles has more than 9,000 marketing jobs for a city of 3.9 million, which places it fifth on our list for total full-time opportunities. Nearly half of these are in the top 40% pay bracket, and marketing managers can expect to make $103,894 on average. Still, nearly all of the jobs available are entry- and mid-level, offering excellent potential experience and resume-building roles. Among the top companies hiring include NBCUniversal, Netflix, Deloitte, Creative Circle, Twentieth Century Fox, University of Southern California, UCLA, and California State University. Within 25 miles of LA – which, let’s face it, is still very much LA — Santa Monica, Long Beach, El Segundo, Burbank, Pasadena, Torrance, and Pasadena are among the biggest employment centers. As the second largest city in the US, LA boasts a diverse and powerful economy, ranking sixth in the the Global Cities Index and 9th in the Global Economic Power Index. Its gross metropolitan product of $831 billion places it behind just New York City and Tokyo. Film and TV are obviously big business – all six major studios are in the city – but there’s much more than entertainment. Six Fortune 500 companies are headquartered here, including Occidental Petroleum, Health Net, Reliance Steel & Aluminum, AECOM Technology, Oaktree Capital Group, and CBRE Group. And the Los Angeles port system is the fifth-busiest in the world, responsible for major imports/exports throughout the Pacific Rim and Western Hemisphere.
14
Anaheim, California
anaheim-california Anaheim comes in at fourteenth, with 8,500 jobs for a city of 350,000. Half of these make up the top 40% pay bracket, and nearly 2,000 pay over $90k. The average salary for a marketing manager is $104,417. Still, entry- and mid-level jobs are available at competitive compensation in large bulk. Among the top companies hiring include Deloitte, B. Braun Medical, Creative Circle, Blizzard Entertainment, Twentieth Century Fox, Abbott, and The University of Southern California. Los Angeles, Irvine, Long Beach, Santa Ana, and Costa Mesa all also offer marketing opportunities. Also known as the home of Disneyland, Anaheim is largely a tourism economy, but major companies are still in town: AT&T, Anaheim Memorial Medical Center, Hewlett Packard, Isuzu (North American headquarters), Kaiser Foundation, CKE Restaurants, Toyota Financial Services, Panasonic, and Raytheon, among others. The city’s proximity to LA is another boon to the economy, and many commute to work in entertainment, financial services, healthcare, and otherwise. Anaheim’s professional sports teams are a major source of civic pride; the Ducks (NHL) and Angels (MLB) have both won their respective league’s championships recently and draw big crowds. Local schools include Anaheim University, Southern California Institute of Technology, Bristol University, and North Orange County Community College.
15
Atlanta, Georgia
atlanta-1584094_1280-1 Atlanta has over 5,700 marketing jobs available to a city of 460,000, many of which offer highly competitive salaries and excellent career prospects. 60% offer pay in the top two-fifths salary tier, and over 1,000 offer more than $90k per year. On average, marketing managers in the city earn just over $93k. Still, entry- and mid-level positions make up the majority of openings. Among those looking are Deloitte, Cox Media Group, Home Depot, Sage, MarketSource, and EY (formerly Ernst & Young). Just outside of the city limits, Alpharetta, Marietta, Norcross, Duluth, Roswell, and Decatur are also offering marketing positions. With a cost of living index at just 98, Atlanta is below the national average and among the most affordable cities on our list. Median rent in 2013 was $963, and the mean pricing for all housing units was $332,012. Long considered the economic capital of the South, Atlanta has grown in recent decades to become one of the most diversified, powerful economies in the country, ranking 8th in the US and 17th in the world. Housing the third-highest concentration of Fortune 500 companies, it is the world headquarters of The Coca-Cola Company, The Home Depot, Delta Air Lines, AT&T Mobility, Chick-fil-A, UPS, and Newell-Rubbermaid. Major industries include transportation (Hartsfield-Jackson is the world’s busiest airport), logistics, media and entertainment, healthcare, IT, and financial services.
16
Santa Ana, California
santa-ana Santa Ana has 4,800 marketing jobs for a city of 335,000. Half of these are in the top 40% for compensation, and over a thousand pay more than $90k. On average, marketing managers in the city earn $102,614. Entry- and mid-level positions remain the most supplied. Companies hiring typically include B. Braun Medical, Blizzard Entertainment, The Irvine Company, H&R Block, and others. Irvine, Long Beach, Costa Mesa, Anaheim, and Newport Beach are other options within 25 miles. The second most populous city in Orange County, Santa Ana’s cost of living index stands at 129. In 2013, median rent was $1,296, and the mean price of all housing units was $333,153. (All said, average for our list, if above average nationally.) As one of the densest cities in the country, Santa Ana is also among the safest, ranked fourth in the country by Forbes. The top employers in the area are The County of Orange, Ingram Micro, Rancho Santiago Community College, and Tenet Healthcare, but Santa Ana is also home to several corporate headquarters, including Behr Paint, CoreLogic, First American Corporation, and Greenwood & Hall. Xerox, Ultimate Software, and T-Mobile each have regional headquarters in the city. Also of note, Rickenbacker, which became famous in the 1960s and 70s for its unique electric guitars and basses. Beyond its economy, Santa Ana has numerous parks and recreation centers, museums, and a zoo.
17
Dallas, Texas
dallas-1740681_1280 Dallas has almost 6,000 marketing positions for a city of 1.3 million. 46% of these are in the top two-fifths of salaries, and 1,400 senior positions pay over $90k. On average, a marketing manager in the city earns about $93,000. Entry-level and mid-level professionals need not worry: most positions are found here and pay competitively. Among those offering positions include The Marketing Arm, Epsilon, Deloitte, Creative Circle, JPMorgan Chase, Mckesson, Sabre, and Lennox International. Top agencies include Brierley & Partners, Camelot Communications, GSD&M, The LOOMIS Agency, The Richards Group, Slingshot, and Southwest Media Group. Plano, Richardson, Irving, and Arlington all offer a number of marketing positions as well. For a combination of professional opportunities and affordable living, few places can beat Dallas’s 93.8 cost of living index. In 2013, median rent was $839 and the mean for housing units was $240,562. Its 2014 GDP grew to over $504 billion, and the the city recently became the fourth-largest employment center in the country, behind only New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. According to the GAWC, Dallas was named a “beta plus” world city and ranked 14th for GDP according to he Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Companies headquartered or with major offices in town include AT&T, Dean Foods, Texas Instruments, Southwest Airlines, Energy Future Holdings Corporation, Tenet Healthcare, Affiliated Computer Services, and Energy Transfer Equity, among others.
18
Phoenix, Arizona
phoenix Phoenix has over 4,000 marketing jobs available to a population of 1.5 million. Half of these make up the top 40% pay bracket, and a thousand pay over $90k. Marketing managers make $93,290 on average. Still, entry- and mid-level positions are by far the most available and pay at a competitive tier. In the area, companies hiring include Real Peoples Ratings, Romulus, Sun Marketing Solutions, Terradin, Insight Enterprise, and H&R Block. Top agencies include RIESTER, LaneTerralever, LAVIDGE, Out The Window Advertising, and Owens Harkey Advertising, the first three of which had capitalized billings exceeding $100MM in 2014. Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa, and Chandler also offer positions nearby. With a cost of living index at 93, Phoenix is affordable and growing. In 2013, median rent was $868, while the mean price for overall housing was $214,846. In 2014, the city’s GDP topped $200 billion; in particular, real estate, financial services and insurance, manufacturing, retail, and healthcare were the largest business sectors. Four Fortune 500 companies call Phoenix home – Avnet, Freeport-McMoRan, PetSmart, and Republic Services – and Honeywell, U-HAUL International, Best Western, and Apollo Group all have regional offices in the area. Several performing arts centers are located in the city, along with museums, fine arts galleries, and notable architecture from Frank Lloyd Wright, Paolo Soleri, Will Bruder, and others, who have been instrumental in developing Arizona’s unmistakeable desert aesthetic.
19
Garland, Texas
A rapid transit train (DART) with the skyline of Dallas, Texas in the background

A rapid transit train (DART) with the skyline of Dallas, Texas in the background

Garland has just shy of 5,300 full-time marketing jobs for a population of 240,000. About half of these offer compensation in the top 40%, and over a thousand pay more than $90k per year. Marketing managers in the city can expect to earn $91,109 on average. Most jobs nevertheless remain directed at entry- and mid-level professionals. Companies hiring in the area include The Marketing Arm, Epsilon, Deloitte, RealPage, McKesson, JPMorgan Chase, Capital One, and UT Southwestern Medical Center. Nearby, Dallas, Plano, Irving, Richardson, and Frisco are hiring. (Dallas’s top agencies include Brierley & Partners, Camelot Communications, GSD&M, The LOOMIS Agency, The Richards Group, Slingshot, and Southwest Media Group.) With a 93 cost of living index, Garland is among the more affordable cities on our list, and professionals won’t have to forfeit career opportunities. In 2013, median rent was $883, and mean housing prices were $214,086. The city is often overlooked in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, but CNN and Money ranked Garland #67 on their Top 100 Places to Live.” On that note, it’s also been ranked #7 among best cities to save money. The city’s top private employers are Baylor Medical Center, Kraft Foods, US Food Service, and Hatco. Garland is also home to a half-dozen corporate headquarters and regional offices for Sherwin Williams, Dynamics, and Valspar. For life beyond work, the city has nearly 3,000 acres of parks, four performing arts centers, and museums. Richland College and Amberton University are both within city limits.
20
Irving, Texas
Highway traffic passing around Dallas skyline at dusk (Newscom TagID: scphotos111175) [Photo via Newscom]

Highway traffic passing around Dallas skyline at dusk (Newscom TagID: scphotos111175) [Photo via Newscom]

At a population of 240,000, Irving has 6,800 full-time marketing jobs within 25 miles. 43% of jobs rank in the top two-fifths of compensation, and 1,500 pay above $90k. Marketing managers in the city can expect $92,928 on average. Entry- and mid-level professionals make equally competitive salaries, ranging from $30k to $50-60k. Some companies listing marketing positions in the area include The Marketing Arm, Epsilon, Deloitte, Mckesson, JPMorgan Chase, and Creative Circle. Nearby Dallas also has some of the best ad agencies in the region; among them, Brierley & Partners, Camelot Communications, GSD&M, The LOOMIS Agency, The Richards Group, Slingshot, and Southwest Media Group. Fort Worth and Plano are other close options. Irving’s 93.6 cost of living index places it among the most affordable on the list. Median rent was $882 in 2013, and mean housing prices were $189,567. Many major corporations have major offices or headquarters in the city, and top employers in 2012-13 were Citigroup, Verizon, Irving Mall, Aegis Communications, Allstate Insurance, YRC Worldwide, Nokia, and Microsoft. ExxonMobil, Michaels Stores, and the Boy Scouts of America have headquarters. The University of Dallas, North Lake College, Dallas County Community College, and Devry University are all within the city limits.
20
Plano, Texas
plano_two Plano, Texas, population 280,0000, has about 5,300 full-time marketing jobs within a 25 mile radius. Half of these jobs rank in the top two-fifths of compensation, and over a thousand pay above $90k per year. Marketing managers in town can expect to make $88,911 on average. Entry- and mid-level professionals also have competitive salaries, ranging from $30k to $50-$60k. Among those hiring include The Marketing Arm, Epsilon, Deloitte, Creative Circle, JPMorgan Chase, McKesson, Capital One, and Lennox International. Plano residents can also easily commute to Dallas, where some of the region’s best agencies are located, including GSD&M, The LOOMIS Agency, Brierley & Partners, Camelot Communications, and others. Plano’s cost of living index stands at 94.4, making it among the more affordable cities on our list. In 2013, median rent was $1,120 and mean pricing for all housing units was $253,125. For those looking for more corporate opportunities, Plano is home to a range of top corporate headquarters: Alliance Data, Cinemark Theatres, Dell Services, Denbury Resources, Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, Ericsson, Frito-Lay, Dell Services, HP Enterprise Services, Huawei, JC Penney, Pizza Hut, Rent-A-Center, Traxxas, Siemens PLM Software, Yum! Restaurants International, and Toyota Motors USA. There are nearly 4,000 acres of parks in town, and Collin College, Dallas Baptist University North, and SMU-in-Plano are all in town (the latter of which offers graduate business tracks for working professionals.)
22
Denver, Colorado
denver-1567052_1280 Denver has 3,800 full-time marketing jobs for a city of about 680,000. More than half of these offer salaries in the top 40%, and 950 offer compensation above $90k. Marketing managers can expect to make about $95k on average, but many jobs available are for entry- and mid-level professionals, starting at around $25k through $60k and 75$k. Among those hiring include King Soopers, DISH Network, GNC – General Nutrition Centers, Sound Advice Consulting Services, University of Colorado, Oracle, and Comcast. Though Denver has the highest concentration of professional opportunities, Aurora, Boulder, Englewood, Broomfield, and Littleton are among the other nearby cities with marketing positions available. The Mile High City is ranked as a Beta-world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network, but the city’s economy is rapidly expanding. In 2010, Denver had a GMP of $160 billion; in 2015, Forbes named it #1 on its list of the Best Places for Business and Careers. Numerous companies have headquarters or significant operations in town, including Molson Coors Brewing Company, Coors Distributing Company, Newmont Mining Corporation, Lockheed Martin, United Airlines, Kroger Co., Xcel Energy, EnCana, Halliburton, Smith International, Starz-Encore, DIRECTV, and others. Its 110 cost of living index is slightly above the national average, but is relatively cheaper than some of the major cities on this list. In 2013, median rent was $898 and mean pricing for housing units was $324,041.
22
Raleigh, North Carolina
raleigh-nc Raleigh has about 2,000 full-time marketing jobs available for a city of 450,000. More than half of jobs offer salaries in the top two-fifths, and a quarter offer salaries above $90k. Still, many positions are available for entry- and mid-level professionals, with compensation from $30k-$65k. Among those hiring include Lenovo, Harris Teeter, NC State University, Cisco Systems, IBM, Eli Global, and the State of North Carolina. As part of the Research Triangle, Durham, Cary, Morrisville, and Chapel Hill all have marketing positions nearby. In 2015, Raleigh was ranked #3 on Forbes‘s list of Best Places For Business And Careers, with a GMP of $68.5 billion. Its 95 cost of living index ranks it among the cheapest cities on our list, particularly appealing in light of the city’s growth projections. The economy is diverse – financial services; electrical, medical, electronic and telecommunications equipment; clothing; food processing; and pharmaceuticals – and includes a number of headquarters: BB&T Insurance Services, Capitol Broadcasting Company, First Citizens BancShares, Golden Corral, Martin Marietta Materials, Red Hat, Waste Industries, and Lulu, among others. In other lists, Raleigh ranks #1 on America’s Best Places to Live, according to Businessweek; #1 for Fastest Growing Cities for Technology Jobs, according to Dice; and #1 for Forbes‘s America’s Most Wired Cities.
22
Chula Vista, California
chula_vista Chula Vista has 2,400 full-time marketing jobs for a population of 265,000. More than half offer salaries in the top two-fifths, and nearly a quarter pay more than $90k per year. The average salary for marketing managers is just under $100k. That said, hundreds of entry- and mid-level positions are available at competitive compensations, as well. Among those hiring include UC San Diego, Biolegend, Illumina, Inc., Union Bank, HP, Seismic Software, California State University, and more. Within 25 miles of Chula Vista, San Diego, El Cajon, La Jolla, La Mesa, and Poway each have marketing positions open. At a 133 cost of living index, the San Diego suburb is among the more expensive cities on the list. In 2013, median rent was $1,217 and mean pricing for all housing units was $346,902. Still, its proximity to San Diego also brings professional opportunities and benefits. San Diego is a national leader in biotechnology, international trade, research, and tourism; in addition to the Navy, the area’s largest employers include Sharp HealthCare, Qualcomm, Dexcom, Kaiser Permanente, and Scripps Health. In 2014, GMP topped $200 billion. Its also an excellent area for entrepreneurs: in 2014, Forbes ranked it #1 on its list of Best Places To Launch A Startup. Of course, the city has no shortage of cultural attractions – from museums, to theaters, to world-class restaurants – and Los Angeles is just a short drive along the coast.
25
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
philadelphia-231580_1280 Philadelphia has over 5,000 full-time marketing jobs for a city of 1.6 million. Over half of these pay in the top two-fifths of salaries, and over a thousand offer over $90k per year. Marketing managers can expect to make just under $100k on average, but plenty of entry- and mid-level positions are available, too. Among those hiring include Wawa, Comcast, QuintilesIMS, Lincoln Financial, JPMorgan Chase, CSL Behring, Vanguard, Deloitte, and Boston Market Corporation. While Philly has the highest concentration of career options, Wilmington, King of Prussia, Malvern, and West Chester also hire. Philadelphia’s cost of living index is 105, higher than the national average but relatively affordable for a major American city. In 2013, rent was $913 and and mean pricing for housing units was $182,131. With a GMP of nearly $400 billion, Philly ranks fourth in the country and ninth worldwide. There are number of high-profile corporations headquartered in town, including seven Fortune 1000 companies. Some top employers include Comcast, Aramark, Crown Holdings, FMC, Urban Outfitters, Chemtura, and Pep Boys. It is also a major education center, housing the the third-largest student concentration on the East Coast, with top-ranked schools like the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University, Temple University, and the Curtis Institute of Music. Philly is the only World Heritage City in the United States.

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What is Storyteller Marketing? http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/what-is-storyteller-marketing/ Thu, 15 Dec 2016 23:54:20 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=699 People would rather be told a story than be told what to do. When was the last time you remember seeing an ad that told you to “Call Now” or […]

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People would rather be told a story than be told what to do.

When was the last time you remember seeing an ad that told you to “Call Now” or “Click Here” and you called then or clicked there? 1995? Never? Okay, so when was the last time you remember hearing a story and thought “Wow. That just changed my life.” Did you then go on to change your life, or at least view things differently? Whether or not you realize it, chances are you did. Which means chances are you’ve felt the impact of storyteller marketing.
“Marketing is storytelling.” – Seth Godin, author of All Marketers are Liars (2005)
Organizations from every industry in the world have used storyteller marketing at various points in time to frame their purpose, scope, and reach. It just so happens that more industries than usual are using it today, from automotive, to education, to online media, to manufacturing.     Why? Much of it has to do with the social revolution that content marketing brought on. But if you really want to know why storyteller marketing is so vital today, you must first read a story.

Enter BILL GATES

On January 3rd, 1996—over a year after the Internet was privatized—Bill Gates published a column on Microsoft’s website, decreeing “Content is King.” In what would only take a few short scrolls, Gates declared (in “Hear ye, Hear ye” fashion) that the Internet would become a boon to publishers everywhere, predicting that on the information superhighway, the value of “information and entertainment” would reign supreme, and that “Those who succeed [at monetizing its value] will propel the Internet forward as a marketplace of ideas, experiences, and products—a marketplace of content.” What happened over the next 20 years bore out his prophecy. Where initially the private Internet served as a two-dimensional billboard for advertisements that were based predominantly in brick-and-mortar businesses, it would become a multi-dimensional space for the exchange of goods, services, and ideas: an online marketplace based on the concept of creating a global village where any transaction could take place.

Enter THE CONTENT MARKETER

“Thanks to neuroscience, we’ve learned [that] no rhetorical tool is more effective than the story. We know why stories work, how they work on the brain, and, best of all, we know the formula.” – Carmine Gallo, author of The Storyteller’s Secret: How the World’s Most Inspiring Leaders Turn their Passion into Performance (2016)
Circa the year 2000, banner advertising gave way to paid content, while new and complex software became a hot commodity. Online businesses started to need people who could explain the purpose of their product, software, or service to those who weren’t tech-savvy. That is, they started needing people to tell their stories. And they started needing a new medium with which to do it. What they got initially was news coverage, like this CBS story from 2005 on a little startup called Facebook. Along with Google, Facebook would climb its way to the top of the list of the largest Internet companies and become the medium that online brands would need to spread their story. What online businesses got next were full-time, in-house brand managers to explain the value of their company: Chief Storytellers, Explainers in Chief, Content Managers, and all other manner of creative role titles in between that refer to someone who tells a company story. It would be the job of these professional explainers to condense and simplify a company’s message into a few short sentences that were so easy to understand that even a five year old could watch, read, listen, and say “I get it.” Or maybe even “I want it.”

Enter REVOLUTION

“The content marketing revolution signals more than a mere marketing fad. It marks an important new chapter in the history of business communications: the era of corporate enlightenment.” – Alexander Jutkowitz, author of The Content Marketing Revolution at Harvard Business Review
By 2010, an industry had grown up around feeding the demand for creating and telling a brand’s story. By 2013, even small startups were grooming themselves to join the ranks of new media publishing companies that were paricipating in a social revolution, a marketing movement in which storytellers have come to play the most integral role: to tell an informative story with every word, image, and video on this side of the screen. And so it came to pass that the art of telling a brand story—and of doing it in a way that places a company firmly within the context of broader social, political, and ethical movements—became not only popular, but essential to surviving as a predominantly online businesses in the twenty-first century. The rest, they say, is history, waiting to be written. How will you be part of the storyteller marketing revolution? Tell us at j.r.jacksonian@gmail.com

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Editor’s Choice: The 11 Best Books on Branding http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/best-branding-books/ Fri, 09 Dec 2016 21:29:13 +0000 http://www.bestmarketingdegrees.org/?p=673 Branding isn’t as straightforward as it once was. Remember the good old days when all you needed to brand your product was Jack Smithy to fire up the bellows and […]

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Branding isn’t as straightforward as it once was. Remember the good old days when all you needed to brand your product was Jack Smithy to fire up the bellows and prod your heifer with a hot-lettered iron? Neither do we. But we do remember the principles of marketing, which like many of the ways that business is conducted, have changed over the years. And what we know about these changes is that as the years go by, the practice of creating a calling card that people can not only trust, but also come to love, value, and identify with your product, company, or organization over all others is as complicated as boiling down an ocean of information into a single word as easy to swallow as a glass of water. And that’s especially true in the era of Internet marketing, where we are constantly bombarded with wave upon wave of branded content every time we open our web browser.

Branding our own business can seem even more difficult when we consider the odds we’re up against: (1) the fact that all the best brands are simple, and (2) the fear that all the simplest ideas are taken. (Spoiler alert: they’re not).

So to give our audience an idea of how many ways there are to brand a product; to demonstrate that there are as many simple brand ideas out there as there are people on the planet; and to reassure marketers everywhere that some of the best brands have yet to be created, we’ve assembled this ranking of the 11 Best Branding Books Of All Time. And we say 11, because in this competitive run-off, three books tied for 9th. But using this reading list, we think anyone can learn how to brand under any circumstances.

Our methodology for compiling this ranking was to sift through the nearly 650 books shelved under “branding marketing” on the popular reader review site, Goodreads. We then handpicked the only 128 with at least two ratings, and scored them according to the average number of stars that readers have given them; the total number of ratings each book has received; and the relevance of their author to developing an understanding of the branding discipline. Only the highest rated, most rated, and most authorially relevant books rose to the top of our list. See if you recognize some of the titles. If you’ve been one of the many entrepreneurs who’ve branded your own business, we bet you’ll recognize at least one title, and perhaps even several that you’ve read yourself.

1. Marketing Management by Philip Kotler and Kevin Lane Keller

marketing_management

Marketing Management is a textbook in its 15th edition published by Pearson Education and written by two of the most honorable American marketing authorities, Philip Kotler and Kevin Keller. In what has been called the “gold standard” of books for both graduate and undergraduate marketing students today, the two authors add to their ever-growing collection of scholarship on branding and brand management, delivering on their own brand promise to be the first to reflect changes in marketing theory and practice. First published in December of 1987, Marketing Management has kept up with every trend in the field of marketing for nearly 30 years. A veritable work of marketing history, the text is written for those who look to stand on the helm of the future of brand management by enabling themselves to communicate knowledgeably with some of the best minds in marketing. Indeed, it provides a clear window into concepts both past and present that have dictated how marketers interact with each other and their audiences, exploring the underlying theory of brand management, and providing a thorough glimpse of into the core principles of marketing today. Although the authors cannot predict the future, each of their editions provides a basic, well-researched foundation of knowledge necessary for any individual to reasonably speculate on and create brand strategy for their product, company, or organization. As this foundational reference work continues to grow with each edition, the reader experience is one of a steady and constant enlightenment, an awakening we definitely need if we’re going to understand the ever-changing complexity of branding, which Marketing Management makes simple.

 

2. Kellogg on Branding: The Marketing Faculty of the Kellogg School of Management by Alice M. Tybout and Tim Calkins, with a Foreword by Philip Kotler

kellog_on_branding

Kellogg on Branding is a comprensive review of the most up-to-date strategies for building, leveraging, and reimagining brands. Co-authored by professors at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, Alice M. Tybout and Tim Calkins, along with a Foreword by Philip Kotler, Kellogg on Branding became a go-to resource upon its 2005 release, since which time a second edition was published in 2011. In creating and updating this resource, Tybout and Calkins became became global voices in a global discussion about the importance of developing a unique and optimal branding strategy for each and every product, company, and organization that needs one. As a testament to the marketer’s time-tested method of operating on the principles of product, place, promotion, and price, the book condenses the art of branding into its most attractive form: the science of solving old marketing problems and seizing new marketing opportunities. Indeed it teaches us not only how to launch new brands, but how to leverage existing ones and manage a large brand portfolio. With practical advice like this, Tybout and Calkins understand that in order for a brand or batch of brands to succeed, marketers should build a brand-centered organization. A fine example of how keeping abreast of current trends can revolutionize a brand’s place in the marketplace, Kellogg on Branding is an excellent read for anyone interested branding, management and how the two can work together to place almost any organization in the spotlight.

3. Brand Hijack: Marketing Without Marketing by Alex Wipperfürth

marketing_without_branding

Brand Hijack is a business book written by professional brand consultant, Alex Wipperfürth. As a thought leader at the head of one of the biggest moves in recent brand history to transform brands into cultural symbols, Wipperfürth draws on his own personal and professional experience as a brand manager to reveal the subtleties of branding in a modern marketplace: a space which is not only a place for monetary trade, but a network for the exchange of ideas that should be driven by the consumer. To build his case, Wipperfürth dives deep into the process of what happens when a brand becomes hijacked; that is, commandeered by consumers and steered in the direction they envision it going. Taking for example cultural movements as diverse as those surrounding Red Bull, The Blair Witch Project, and even the presidential bid of Howard Dean, Wipperfürth spells out how many of the brands and names we remember most fondly (or not-so-fondly) emerged from obscurity by virtue of a young, populist push for accepting their offer over those of traditional names or brands. Published in 2005, Brand Hijack became very popular during this important time in the history of branding, especially because it is explained why so many movements in American culture are motivated by an attempt to subvert convention and that is rooted in a valuation of the underdog over the alpha dog. It also became popular because it is written in a way that is highy accessible to marketing newcomers and latecomers, especially startup junkies who could use advice on some of the best-kept secrets in the branding industry.

4. Unconscious Branding: How Neuroscience Can Empower (and Inspire) Marketing by Douglas Van Praet

unconscious_branding

Unconscious Branding is a business psychology book written by Douglas Van Praet, founder of his branding company by the same name, Unconscious Branding. Published in 2012, it is one of the more recent branding books to provide a beginner’s guide to the practices and principles of consumer behavior from the perspective of a brand manager. By emphasizing the importance of paying attention to the “human strategies” that consumers engage in before buying something instead of their own explanations for why they buy something, Van Praet draws our eye toward the importance of studying consumer behavior toward a given brand. Unconscious Branding is intended to appeal to those engaged with branding across the spectrum, from startup to multinational corporation, and Van Praet works to ensure he covers every aspect of the branding process, from brand ideation to marketing execution to audience feedback. Although targeted primarily at those who have developed some understanding of the concepts of neuromarketing, the book’s thoughtful campaign examples from brands such as Nike, Wendy’s, and Volkswagen are indispensable in terms of providing us with a psychological explanation for why certain brands succeed where others fail. It’s this degree of industry currency and awareness of what makes our minds tick that helps Unconscious Branding rise above the rest and land at the top.

5. Brand Against the Machine: How to Build Your Brand, Cut Through the Marketing Noise, and Stand Out from the Competition by John Michael Morgan

brand_against_the_machine

Brand Against the Machine is a business book written by serial entrepreneur and marketing author, John Michael Morgan. Published in October of 2011, Morgan’s book focuses on answering the question of how to brand a business without the big budget of a traditional corporate brand? As a culmination of Morgan’s several years of experience working with Fortune 500 companies, TV stars, churches, and other entrepreneurs, Brand Against the Machine much of the guide is directly connected to taking newcomers through the steps necessary for creating, setting up, and marketing a new brand. Of course, first-time entrepreneurs, online marketers, and brand managers interested in reaching a broader audience will find the book riveting. Morgan wrote it with them in mind. But its many practical, step-by-step guides for taking a principled stand that positions brands in relation to competitors will be attractive to business owners at all stages who want or need a refresher on some of the basics of oppositional marketing. On these basics, Morgan hits the nail on the head: “We have to stop marketing to people the way we hate to be marketed to.” Inasmuch as this message applies not only to beginners but also to seasoned professionals, it’s no surprise Brand Against the Machine earns a seat at the table among the great books for brands to crack open, again, and again, and again.

6. Branded Nation: The Marketing of Megachurch, College Inc., and Museumworld by James B. Twitchell

branded_nation

Branded Nation is a marketing and sociology book written by former English professor and advertising author, James B. Twitchell. First published in December 2004, the book focuses on answering why branding has become so successful and so pervasive that even cultural and religious institutions like colleges, museums, and churches embrace it wholeheartedly? The book spends ample time explaining how megachurches have come to resemble shopping malls; universities have come to rely so heavily on brand management that they hire more business administrators than professors; and museums have even turned into franchises so as to pad their shoestring budgets. As lifelong expert in the arts of writing and communication, Twitchell is a seasoned, academic professional who is dedicated to art of explaining how, in one way or another, the most respected institutions of society have not only taken notes from the marketplace, but bowed to their rules. And in a move that would surprise many English professors, Branded Nation offers no simplistic condemnation of this trend toward a culture driven by consumption of goods, services, and ideas. Indeed, it extends an open-armed embrace of the trend due to the possibility that comes with it—increased accessibility to some of the most valuable cultural products and ideas available for as many people as possible. And it’s funny. Indeed, because Twitchell is not given to morbid reflection on the decline of culture but celebratory of its spread, his commentary comes across with a sense of humor that only the wisest students of branding could muster.

7. Professional Services Marketing: How the Best Firms Build Premier Brands, Thriving Lead Generation Engines, and Cultures of Business Development Success by Mike Schultz and John Doerr

professional_services_marketing

Professional Services Marketing is a business book written by brand management and business development strategists, Mike Schultz and John Doerr. First published in 2009 and with its latest edition published in 2013, Professional Services Marketing is dedicated to demystifying some of the most technical aspects of building a brand via marketing of professional services, or how a firm can make use of powerful marketing engines and hard data to produce leads and sales. Having a combined 40+ years of experience leading in both business and academic areas of management, Schultz and Doerr are well-suited to explain the art and science of professional services marketing in plain English. They are also well-equipped to tease out the differences between various types of marketing in the professional services, including referral, promotional, and content marketing. Professional Services Marketing is a sprawling work of explanatory branding, delving deep into the data to determine which branding techniques will aid service firms in managing dozens of portfolios while thriving in their own right. And indeed, despite the fact that the book risks wading fairly far into the weeds, Mike Schultz and John Doerr manage to have written a quite accessible branding handbook that remains relevant to this day for the research it brings to the table.

8. How Cool Brands Stay Hot: Branding Generation Y by Joeri Van den Bergh and Mattias Behrer

how_cool_brands_stay_hot

How Cool Brands Stay Hot is an award-winning business book co-written by Belgian market researcher, Joeri Van den Bergh, and Swedish brand manager, Mattias Behrer. First published in 2011 to generally positive reviews, How Cool Brands Stay Hot won the American Marketing Association’s Book of the Year Award for 2012, and has been praised for its timing, value, and translation of issues that matter most to Generation Y. Based on interviews with over 5,000 Generation Y consumers, these issues include which marketing and advertising strategies have become innocuous, which brands have pushed the envelope in terms of revamping these strategies, and how these findings apply to understanding the consumer behavior of that newest and largest generation in recorded global history: Millennials. The 3rd edition, published in 2016 and like those before it, explains the importance of creative positioning, developing, and promoting brands to this demographic, as well as how businessmen and businesswomen can use the branding methods deployed by international companies like Nokia, Nivea, Coca Cola, Red Bull, and Volkswagen in order to drive innovation of their own. With their friendly, strong, and direct voices, Van den Bergh and Behrer draw on greater than 20 years of experience as entrepreneurs to impart researched advice well worth our time. In these respects and many more, How Cool Brands Stay Hot is an excellent explanation of how old and new brands alike can innovate for new audiences.

9. Online Brand Communities: Using the Social Web for Branding and Marketing by Francisco J. Martinez-López, Rafael Anaya-Sánchez, Rocio Aguilar-Illescas, and Sebastián Molinillo (tie)

online_brand_communitites

Online Brand Communities is a work of academic research about online branding by longtime marketing professors, Francisco J. Martinez-López, Rafael Anaya-Sánchez, Rocio Aguilar-Illescas, and Sebastián Molinillo. Published in 2015 as a study of the content boom of the last decade, which saw a large number of online brands come to rely on social media for marketing and advertising, Online Brand Communities lays the foundation for understanding how this recent history has changed branding into a social network. The four authors use this solid foundation in web science to explore the implications of developing a classification system for online branding communities, especially one that takes into account recent trends in brand management. This classification system accounts for questions about the motivating factors for consumers to join, participate, and stay within a particular branding community or social network, and inasmuch, offers answers to questions about how to create value and loyalty among both businesses and consumers. Students of brand management will find the book’s conclusion on the state of online branding and the process of creating online communities quite beneficial to their bottom line. As both a conceptual and practical reference tool—one might even call it a branding handbook for scholars of the trade—Online Branding Communities is an excellent companion piece to any introductory or advanced book on the topic of branding and social networking.

9. Brands in Glass Houses: How to Embrace Transparency and Grow Your Business Through Content Marketing by Dechay Watts, Debbie Williams, and Said Baghill (tie)

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Brands in Glass Houses is business book written by three serial marketing authors and online branding experts: Dechay Watts, Debbie Williams, and Said Baghill. Published in 2013 by Content Marketing Institute, the book is dedicated to helping young companies embrace the principle of transparent operations, uncover their real brand story, and share it with the world. Drawing on their careers of extensive experience branding for companies all over the world, Watts, Williams, and Said explain that across the marketing spectrum, from business-to-business to business-to-consumer, users and consumers are leading our way. They describes the immense importance of engaging with the user instead of at them, of interacting with consumers honestly, and of stepping aboard the revolutionary movement toward selling the complete and total truth with transparency. They explore what this movement means for brand messaging, which needs to connect with its audience on an emotional and intellectual level, not only in order to succeed financially, but also ethically. They even goes so far as to outline in detail the major components of a marketing lifecycle for new brands: creating a brand (and ideally new) story, using content marketing to tell that story, and following an editorial calendar to build brand loyalty. Even seasoned brand managers will find the three authors’ advice a goldmine of information, especially as it pertains to audience education, storyteller marketing, and even PR strategies to adopt for dealing with bad press with competence and honesty. And because so much of its detailed advice is distilled through the lens of authors who understand they are aiming at a moving target,Brands in Glass Houses remains evergreen at a time when a brand content and context are twin kings.

9. Brand Mascots: And Other Marketing Animals by Sharon Ponsonby-McCabe and Stephen Brown (tie)

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Brand Mascots is an edited collection of academic research essays assembled by British marketing and communications professors, Sharon Ponsonby-McCabe and Stephen Brown about company mascots that have made many of the biggest brands most memorable. Published in 2014 as a study of the relationship between brands, animals, and other anthropomorphic figures that consumers have come to associate with popular franchises like Kellogg’s, Michelin, and even Toy Story ,Brand Mascots asks the question why, if these companies are so globally popular, do many corporations turn up their nose at the idea of using animals for their branding strategies? The editors use this collection of essays to explore the idea of raising brand mascots’ profile, from both academic and business perspectives, so that they might be considered for more lucrative branding strategies around the world and in the future. Topics also include Hello Kitty and Angry Birds. Students of brand management will find the book’s speculation on future directions in mascot marketing to be potentially beneficial to their bottom line, especially as that bottom line, at least as far as modern marketers are concerned, increasingly revolves around content and storyteller marketing. And what better subject about which to tell a story than a humanized animal? A quite thoughtful reference tool—one might even think of it as a “call-to-action” for scholars of brand management—Brand Mascots is an excellent collection of authoritative information on the state of animals in branding today, a state in which both animals and branders are slightly better off than when animal branding ruled the day.

Josh R Jackson is Contributing Editor of BestMarketingDegrees.org, a growing resource for online learners, educators, and marketers in between. You can reach him at j.r.jacksonian@gmail.com.

The post Editor’s Choice: The 11 Best Books on Branding appeared first on Best Marketing Degrees.

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